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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #359542

Research Project: Sarcopenia, Nutrition, and Physical Activity

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: Progressive resistance training improves torque capacity and strength in mobility-limited older adults

Author
item Englund, Davis - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Price, Lori - Tufts Medical Center
item Grosicki, Gregory - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Iwai, Megumi - Astellas Pharma Inc
item Kashiwa, Makoto - Astellas Pharma Inc
item Liu, Christine - Boston Medical Center
item Reid, Kieran - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Fielding, Roger - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University

Submitted to: The Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/22/2018
Publication Date: 8/27/2018
Citation: Englund, D., Price, L.L., Grosicki, G., Iwai, M., Kashiwa, M., Liu, C., Reid, K.F., Fielding, R.A. 2018. Progressive resistance training improves torque capacity and strength in mobility-limited older adults. The Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/gly199.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/gly199

Interpretive Summary: Strength or resistance training (weight lifting) is consistently shown to improve muscle strength in older adults. Whether strength training can reduce muscle fatigue in older adults with demonstrated mobility-limitations remains unclear. We assigned older men and women with mobility limitations (slow walking speed) to 12 weeks of strength training or flexibility training. Older adults receiving strength training had significant improvements in their ability to resist muscle fatigue compared to the group receiving flexibility training. Twelve weeks of strength training in mobility limited older adults significantly improved fatigue resistance as well as muscle strength.

Technical Abstract: Background: Progressive resistance training (PRT) is consistently shown to improve muscle strength in older adults. The efficacy of PRT to improve muscle fatigue in older adults with demonstrated mobility-limitations remains unclear. Methods: Mobility-limited (Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) </= 9) older adults (age 70 - 92 yrs.) were recruited for this study and randomized to either PRT or home-based flexibility (FLEX) 3 days/week for 12 weeks. Muscle fatigue and strength outcomes were assessed at baseline and 12 weeks. The primary outcome was torque capacity, a composite measure of strength and fatigue, defined as the sum of peak torques from an isokinetic fatigue test. Results: 70 subjects were randomized [mean (SD) age 78.9 (5.4) years; 60% female; mean (SD) SPPB 7.5 (1.6)]. At follow up, the PRT group improved significantly in torque capacity, mean between-group difference (95% CI) 466.19 (138.4, 793.97) Nm; (p = 0.006), and maximal strength 127.3 (60.96, 193.61) Nm; (p = 0.0003), when compared to FLEX. Neither group demonstrated significant changes in muscle fatigue or torque variability. Conclusion: Twelve weeks of PRT improved torque capacity, as well as strength in mobility-limited older adults. These results demonstrate PRT improves multiple age-related muscular impairments.