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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Burns, Oregon » Range and Meadow Forage Management Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #357217

Research Project: Restoring and Managing Great Basin Ecosystems

Location: Range and Meadow Forage Management Research

Title: Collaboration as a path forward on Western rangelands

Author
item Boyd, Chad
item JOHNSON, DUSTIN - Oregon State University

Submitted to: Trade Journal Publication
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/10/2018
Publication Date: 7/1/2018
Citation: Boyd, C.S., Johnson, D. 2018. Collaboration as a path forward on Western rangelands. Progressive Cattleman. 7:26-27.

Interpretive Summary: Rangeland managers and producers in the sagebrush biome face a myriad of difficult and persistent challenges including altered fire regimes, exotic annual grass invasion, and expanding conifer populations. These challenges are being addressed within the context of diverse societal values and expectations for rangeland resources. Because of these complex social dynamics, collaborative management is emerging as an impactful approach for management of sagebrush rangeland. Collaborative management is a process, not an event, and involves an investment of time sufficient to build trust between often disparate values and understanding of relevant ecology. Constructive disagreement can actually be an important component in building that trust as long as relevant players remain engaged in the process. Science can play a critical part in collaborative progress, particularly when scientists are seen as neutral parties. Important roles of science include helping the collaborative group to define a science-based vision of success and promoting a common understanding of the ecological mechanics of relevant problems.

Technical Abstract: Rangeland managers and producers in the sagebrush biome face a myriad of difficult and persistent challenges including altered fire regimes, exotic annual grass invasion, and expanding conifer populations. These challenges are being addressed within the context of diverse societal values and expectations for rangeland resources. Because of these complex social dynamics, collaborative management is emerging as an impactful approach for management of sagebrush rangeland. Collaborative management is a process, not an event, and involves an investment of time sufficient to build trust between often disparate values and understanding of relevant ecology. Constructive disagreement can actually be an important component in building that trust as long as relevant players remain engaged in the process. Science can play a critical part in collaborative progress, particularly when scientists are seen as neutral parties. Important roles of science include helping the collaborative group to define a science-based vision of success and promoting a common understanding of the ecological mechanics of relevant problems.