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ARS Home » Plains Area » Brookings, South Dakota » Integrated Cropping Systems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #354602

Research Project: Productive Cropping Systems Based on Ecological Principles of Pest Management

Location: Integrated Cropping Systems Research

Title: Resistance to Aphis glycines among wild soybean accessions in laboratory experiments

Author
item Hesler, Louis
item Tillmon, Kelley - The Ohio State University

Submitted to: Crop Protection
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/9/2018
Publication Date: 5/22/2018
Citation: Hesler, L.S., Tillmon, K.J. 2018. Resistance to Aphis glycines among wild soybean accessions in laboratory experiments. Crop Protection. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cropro.2018.05.006.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cropro.2018.05.006

Interpretive Summary: The soybean aphid is a major pest of soybean in the United States, Canada, and eastern Asia. Aphid-resistant soybean cultivars have been developed as a non-chemical management tactic, but viability of this tactic may depend on diverse resistance sources, including soybean’s wild ancestors, in order to counter various resistance-breaking types of soybean aphid. In this study, 10 wild soybean lines were identified as resistant in free-choice screening tests against avirulent soybean aphid, and eight of the lines were advanced for follow-up in two, 20-day-long no-choice tests. Two lines, PI 65549 and PI 135624, did not differ from resistant check PI 549046 in number of aphids per plant after 10 and 20 days of aphid infestation’ Lines 99PI101404B, PI 549035 B, and PI 342618 A had more aphids than PI 549046 by day 20, but fewer aphids than known susceptible lines. In a second no-choice test, lines 99PI81672 and PI 101404 A had fewer aphids than other test lines but more aphids than PI 549046 by day 20. Because of particularly strong resistance in PI 135624 and PI 65549, these two lines should be studied genetically and also tested for resistance against resistance-breaking types of soybean aphid.

Technical Abstract: The soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) is a major pest of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in eastern Asia and in North America. Aphid-resistant soybean cultivars have been developed as a non-chemical management tactic, but viability of this tactic may depend on diverse resistance sources, including wild soybean (Glycine soja Siebold and Zucc.), in order to counter various resistance-breaking soybean aphid biotypes. In this study, 10 wild soybean accessions were identified as resistant in free-choice screening assays against avirulent soybean aphid biotype 1, and eight of the accessions were advanced for follow-up in two, 20-day-long no-choice assays. Two accessions, PI 65549 and PI 135624, did not differ from resistant check PI 549046 in number of aphids per plant after 10 and 20 days of infestation; accessions 99PI101404B, PI 549035 B, and PI 342618 A had more aphids than PI 549046 by day 20, but fewer aphids than known susceptible accessions. In a second no-choice assay, accessions 99PI81672 and PI 101404 A had fewer aphids than other test accessions but more aphids than PI 549046 by day 20. Because of particularly strong resistance in PI 135624 and PI 65549, these two accessions should be genetically characterized and tested for resistance against virulent soybean aphid biotypes.