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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Boston, Massachusetts » Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352562

Research Project: Sarcopenia, Nutrition, and Physical Activity

Location: Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging

Title: The MAT-sf: identifying risk for major mobility disability

Author
item Rejeski, W - Wake Forest University
item Rushing, Julia - Wake Forest University
item Guralnik, Jack - University Of Maryland
item Ip, Edward - Wake Forest University
item King, Abby - Stanford University
item Manini, Todd - University Of Florida
item Marsh, Anthony - Wake Forest University
item Mcdermott, Mary - Northwestern University
item Fielding, Roger - Jean Mayer Human Nutrition Research Center On Aging At Tufts University
item Newman, Anne - University Of Pittsburgh
item Tudor-locke, Catrine - Pennington Biomedical Research Center
item Gill, Thomas - Yale University

Submitted to: Journal of Gerontology Medical Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/30/2014
Publication Date: 5/1/2015
Citation: Rejeski, W.J., Rushing, J., Guralnik, J.M., Ip, E.H., King, A.C., Manini, T.M., Marsh, A.P., McDermott, M.M., Fielding, R.A., Newman, A.B., Tudor-Locke, C., Gill, T.M. 2015. The MAT-sf: identifying risk for major mobility disability. Journal of Gerontology Medical Science. 70(5):641-646. https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glv003.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/glv003

Interpretive Summary: The purpose of this study was to examine a newly developed self-report measure of mobility, the mobility assessment tool-short form (MAT-sf). The MAT-sf uses video animations as an innovative method to improve measurement accuracy/precision. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate whether MAT-sf scores can be used to identify risk for major mobility disability (MMD). We used data collected from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) study and involved 1,574 older adults between the ages of 70-89. Baseline MAT-sf scores were found to be effective in identifying risk for MMD. Dividing the MAT-sf into four groups revealed that persons with scores <40, 40-49, 50-59, and 60+ had failure (rates of MMD) rates across 42 months of follow-up of 66%, 52%, 35%, and 22%. These results suggest that the MAT-sf is a simple tool that is highly predictive of mobility disability in older adults and can be used to monitor mobility status.

Technical Abstract: BACKGROUND: The assessment of mobility is essential to both aging research and clinical geriatric practice. A newly developed self-report measure of mobility, the mobility assessment tool-short form (MAT-sf), uses video animations as an innovative method to improve measurement accuracy/precision. The primary aim of the current study was to evaluate whether MAT-sf scores can be used to identify risk for major mobility disability (MMD). METHODS: This article is based on data collected from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders study and involved 1,574 older adults between the ages of 70-89. The MAT-sf was administered at baseline; MMD, operationalized as failure to complete the 400-m walk </= 15 minutes, was evaluated at 6-month intervals across a period of 42 months. The outcome of interest was the first occurrence of MMD or incident MMD. RESULTS: After controlling for age, sex, clinic site, and treatment arm, baseline MAT-sf scores were found to be effective in identifying risk for MMD (p < .0001). Partitioning the MAT-sf into four groups revealed that persons with scores <40, 40-49, 50-59, and 60+ had failure rates across 42 months of follow-up of 66%, 52%, 35%, and 22%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The MAT-sf is a quick and efficient way of identifying older adults at risk for MMD. It could be used to clinically identify older adults that are in need of intervention for MMD and provides a simple means for monitoring the status of patients' mobility, an important dimension of functional health.