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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Plant Germplasm Introduction and Testing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352483

Research Project: Management of Priority Legume, Oilseed, Vegetable, Forage Grass, Sugar, Ornamental, and Medicinal Plant Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: Plant Germplasm Introduction and Testing Research

Title: Taking lentils out of their comfort zone

Author
item Wright, D.j. - University Of Saskatchewan
item Neupane, S. - University Of Saskatchewan
item Heidecker, T.l. - University Of Saskatchewan
item Nielsen, K. - University Of Saskatchewan
item Chan, C. - University Of Saskatchewan
item Gioia, T. - University Of Saskatchewan
item Rubiales, D. - Consejo Superior De Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC)
item Barilli, E. - Consejo Superior De Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC)
item Udupa, S. - International Center For Agricultural Research In The Dry Areas (ICARDA)
item Mehra, R. - International Center For Agricultural Research In The Dry Areas (ICARDA)
item Sarkar, A. - International Center For Agricultural Research In The Dry Areas (ICARDA)
item Hossain, M. - Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute
item Anwar, B. - Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute
item Dhakal R, R. - Local Initiatives For Biodiversity, Research And Development
item Coyne, Clarice - Clare
item Mcgee, Rebecca
item Vandenberg, A. - University Of Saskatchewan
item Bett, K. - University Of Saskatchewan

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/15/2016
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: none

Technical Abstract: Lentil is grown in many parts of the world where the photoperiod and temperature prior to flowering differ dramatically. Cultivars from one region struggle to perform well in other regions due to problems related to phenology. This makes breeders reluctant to use un-adapted material in their crosses with a consequence of loss of genetic variability within their program. To better understand how lentil is adapted to different marco-environments, and to identify markers for genes that control adaptation responses, we grew a diversity panel of 324 accessions for two seasons in nine locations around the world: three each in South Asia, North America, and around the Mediterranean. Data were recorded for phenology and related traits, and environmental data were collected. All accessions matured in the Canadian environment, but only 1/3 reached maturity before the temperatures got too high in the South Asian locations. The South Asian lines typically flowered and matured very quickly in Canada, not leaving enough time to develop much seed. Across the accessions, however, there was a lot of variability in response across the different growing environments. We also genotyped all lines extensively to better understand the underlying genetic variability in these lines. An association mapping study will allow us to identify regions of the genome that are associated with key traits related to adaptation.