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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Animal Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #352371

Research Project: Diagnostic and Control Strategies for Malignant Catarrhal Fever

Location: Animal Disease Research

Title: Malignant catarrhal fever

Author
item O'tool, D - University Of Wyoming
item Li, Hong

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/8/2018
Publication Date: 7/20/2018
Citation: O'Tool, D., Li, H. 2018. Malignant catarrhal fever. Book Chapter. Anipedia 1-35.

Interpretive Summary: Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a disseminated and generally fatal virus disease of domestic cattle and wildlife. It is caused by several herpesviruses in the MCF virus group. The MCF viruses are carried by natural hosts, such as sheep, goats and wildebeest. When the viruses are transmitted to disease susceptible hosts, such as cattle, deer and bison, MCF often occurs. The disease is globally distributed and has significant economic impact on agriculture worldwide. As the interests of brevity in this chapter, we highlight more recent developments about current understanding of MCF. These include the expansion of the MCF virus (MCFV) group to 10 members, current diagnostic assays, recognition of additional susceptible hosts, confirmation that sheep and pigs can develop MCF, current thoughts about disease mechanism, and the prospect of effective vaccines.

Technical Abstract: Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a disseminated and generally fatal virus disease of domestic cattle and wildlife. It is caused by several gammaherpesviruses in the MCF virus group of Macavirus genus. The MCF viruses exist in nature as subclinical infections in well-adapted species that serve as reservoirs. When the viruses are transmitted to clinically susceptible species, to which they are poorly adapted, MCF often develops. The disease is globally distributed and has significant economic impact on agriculture worldwide. As the interests of brevity in this chapter, we highlight more recent developments about current understanding of MCF. These include the expansion of the MCF virus group to 10 members, current diagnostic assays, recognition of additional susceptible species, confirmation that sheep and pigs can develop MCF, current thoughts about pathogenesis, and the prospect of effective vaccines.