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Research Project: Management of Temperate-Adapted Fruit, Nut, and Specialty Crop Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: National Clonal Germplasm Repository

Title: Repository contributions to Rubus research

Author
item Bushakra, Jill
item Alice, Lawrance A - Western Kentucky University
item Carter, Katie - Oregon State University
item Dossett, Michael - British Columbia Blueberry Council
item Liston, Aaron - Oregon State University
item Meiers, Ruth - Wageningen University
item Mulch, Christina - Oregon State University
item Peterson, Mary
item Vining, K.j. - Oregon State University
item Zurn, Jason
item Finn, Chad
item Bassil, Nahla
item Hummer, Kim

Submitted to: North American Raspberry & Blackberry Association Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/9/2018
Publication Date: 2/21/2018
Citation: Bushakra, J., Alice, L., Carter, K., Dossett, M., Liston, A., Meiers, R., Mulch, C., Peterson, M.E., Vining, K., Zurn, J.D., Finn, C.E., Bassil, N.V., Hummer, K.E. 2018. Repository contributions to Rubus research. North American Raspberry & Blackberry Association Meeting. North American Raspberry & Blackberry Association Meeting.

Interpretive Summary: The USDA National Plant Germplasm System is a nation-wide source for global genetic resources. The National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) in Corvallis, OR, maintains crops and crop wild relatives for the Willamette Valley including pear, raspberry and blackberry, strawberry, blueberry, gooseberry and currant, hazelnut, hops, mint and many other genera. Each year researchers from around the world request materials from these collections for research on molecular, breeding, disease, and other projects. We are highlighting four Rubus-specific research projects using the Repository resources. The evolutionary relationships of the many species of Rubus is being teased out using molecular tools and the diversity of the Repository collection in collaboration with Oregon State and Western Kentucky Universities. The pedigree of the cultivar Boysen is being tested using molecular fingerprinting of multiple Boysen accessions and its possible parents. Research in collaboration with Wageningen University in The Netherlands is looking into the genes that control resistance to powdery mildew that infects red raspberry. Collaboration with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada is looking into identifying the genes responsible for resistance to aphid feeding in black raspberry to reduce the occurrence of the aphid-borne Black raspberry necrosis virus complex. These four research projects, and many others, are made more accessible to the researchers by the availability of wide genetic diversity maintained at NCGR.

Technical Abstract: The USDA National Plant Germplasm System is a nation-wide source for global genetic resources. The National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) in Corvallis, OR, maintains crops and crop wild relatives for the Willamette Valley including pear, raspberry and blackberry, strawberry, blueberry, gooseberry and currant, hazelnut, hops, mint and many other genera. Each year researchers from around the world request materials from these collections for research on molecular, breeding, disease, and other projects. We are highlighting four Rubus-specific research projects using the Repository resources. The evolutionary relationships of the many species of Rubus is being teased out using molecular tools and the diversity of the Repository collection in collaboration with Oregon State and Western Kentucky Universities. The pedigree of the cultivar Boysen is being tested using molecular fingerprinting of multiple Boysen accessions and its possible parents. Research in collaboration with Wageningen University in The Netherlands is looking into the genes that control resistance to powdery mildew that infects red raspberry. Collaboration with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada is looking into identifying the genes responsible for resistance to aphid feeding in black raspberry to reduce the occurrence of the aphid-borne Black raspberry necrosis virus complex. These four research projects, and many others, are made more accessible to the researchers by the availability of wide genetic diversity maintained at NCGR.