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ARS Home » Midwest Area » Ames, Iowa » Corn Insects and Crop Genetics Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #348150

Research Project: Managing Insects in the Corn Agro-Ecosystem

Location: Corn Insects and Crop Genetics Research

Title: Genomic mechanisms of sympatric ecological and sexual divergence in a model agricultural pest, the European corn borer

Author
item Coates, Brad
item Dopman, Erik - Tufts University
item Wanner, Kevin - Montana State University
item Sappington, Thomas

Submitted to: Current Opinion in Insect Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/28/2018
Publication Date: 4/26/2018
Citation: Coates, B.S., Dopman, E.B., Wanner, K.W., Sappington, T.W. 2018. Genomic mechanisms of sympatric ecological and sexual divergence in a model agricultural pest, the European corn borer. Current Opinion in Insect Science. 26:50-56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cois.2018.01.005.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cois.2018.01.005

Interpretive Summary: Optimal growth and reproduction of insect pests of cultivated corn result from their adaptation to local environmental conditions and interaction with prospective mates. ARS researchers and university collaborators provide a summary of adaptations in European corn borer populations that result in varying numbers of reproductive generations per year, along with a review of current literature that identified potential genetic mechanisms and implications on gene flow between locally adapted corn borers. Additionally, authors review current literature on variation in chemical and behavioral communication involved in sexual attraction and response, where differences have resulted in partial reproductive isolation. Reproductive isolating mechanism are predicted to also affect the rate at which alleles conferring resistance to insecticides may spread within a population. This literature review article is of interest to university, government and private industry stakeholders concerned about the impact of gene flow and local ecological adaptations of insect pest populations on resistance management programs.

Technical Abstract: Optimal growth and reproduction of insect pests of cultivated corn result from their adaptation to local environmental conditions and interaction with prospective mates. ARS researchers and university collaborators provide a summary of adaptations in European corn borer populations that result in varying numbers of reproductive generations per year, along with a review of current literature that identified potential genetic mechanisms and implications on gene flow between locally adapted corn borers. Additionally, authors review current literature on variation in chemical and behavioral communication involved in sexual attraction and response, where differences have resulted in partial reproductive isolation. Reproductive isolating mechanism are predicted to also affect the rate at which alleles conferring resistance to insecticides may spread within a population. This literature review article is of interest to university, government and private industry stakeholders concerned about the impact of gene flow and local ecological adaptations of insect pest populations on resistance management programs.