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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Newark, Delaware » Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347539

Research Project: Classical Biological Control of Insect Pests of Crops, Emphasizing Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Spotted Wing Drosophila and Tarnished Plant Bug

Location: Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit

Title: Experimental assessment of the biosafety of Trissolcus japonicus in New Zealand, prior to the anticipated arrival of the invasive pest Halyomorpha halys

Author
item CHARLES, JOHN - New Zealand Institute Of Plant & Food Research
item AVILA, GONZALO - New Zealand Institute Of Plant & Food Research
item Hoelmer, Kim
item HUNT, SOPHIE - New Zealand Institute Of Plant & Food Research
item GARDNER-GEE, ROBIN - New Zealand Institute Of Plant & Food Research
item MACDONALD, FRANCES - New Zealand Institute Of Plant & Food Research
item DAVIS, VICKY - New Zealand Institute Of Plant & Food Research

Submitted to: Biocontrol
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/2/2019
Publication Date: 7/9/2019
Citation: Charles, J.G., Avila, G.A., Hoelmer, K.A., Hunt, S., Gardner-Gee, R., MacDonald, F., Davis, V. Experimental assessment of the biosafety of Trissolcus japonicus in New Zealand, prior to the anticipated arrival of the invasive pest Halyomorpha halys. BioControl 64, 367–379 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10526-019-09949-x
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10526-019-09949-x

Interpretive Summary: Despite numerous border interceptions, as of 2017 the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) has not yet established in New Zealand. To prepare for its possible arrival, a biocontrol program has been proposed using its principal natural enemy in Asia, the egg-parasitic “samurai wasp” Trissolcus japonicus. To examine possible ecological consequences of its deliberate introduction, the wasp was imported from a laboratory culture in the USA to a New Zealand containment laboratory. Wasps were then exposed to eggs of seven species of predatory and phytophagous New Zealand stink bugs. Six of the stink bug species were attacked by the parasitoid, but were not all equally suitable in supporting wasp development. The cosmopolitan pest stink bug Nezara viridula was not attacked at all. Taking into account the potential climatic range of BMSB and the samurai wasp, habitat differences between BMSB and the New Zealand stink bugs, and the conservation status of these species, it is expected that that post-release attacks of non-target species by T. japonicus in New Zealand will be incidental and ecologically insignificant.

Technical Abstract: Despite numerous interceptions at the border, the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys, is not yet established in New Zealand. In preparation for its possible arrival, a classical biocontrol program using the egg parasitoid Trissolcus japonicus has been established. Parasitised BMSB eggs were imported into containment from Newark, DE, USA and F0 adult females were then exposed to eggs of 7 species and one sub-species of New Zealand Pentatomidae in no-choice laboratory experiments. The predatory Cermatulus nasalis nasalis, Cermatulus nasalis hudsoni and Oechalia schellenbergii, and the phytophagous Monteithiella humeralis, Dictyotus caenosus, Glaucias amyoti, and Cuspicona simplex were all confirmed as physiological hosts for the parasitoid, although not all were equally susceptible to attack. The cosmopolitan pest Nezara viridula was not attacked, nor were species of Acanthosomatidae. The likely ecological consequences of these results are discussed, taking into account the potential climatic range of BMSB and T. japonicus, habitat differences between BMSB and the New Zealand Pentatomidae, and the conservation status of these species. It is concluded that the available data support expectations (based on global experience) that post-release attacks of non-target species by T. japonicus in New Zealand will be incidental and insignificant.