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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Fort Pierce, Florida » U.S. Horticultural Research Laboratory » Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #347118

Research Project: IPM Methods for Insect Pests of Orchard Crops

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: An evaluation of mosquito repellents and essential plant oils as deterrents of Asian citrus psyllid

Author
item Hall, David
item Borovsky, Dov - Oak Ridge Institute For Science And Education (ORISE)
item Chauhan, Kamal
item Shatters, Robert - Bob

Submitted to: Crop Protection
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/11/2018
Publication Date: 2/22/2018
Citation: Hall, D.G., Borovsky, D., Chauhan, K.R., Shatters, R.G. 2018. An evaluation of mosquito repellents and essential plant oils as deterrents of Asian citrus psyllid. Crop Protection. 108:87-94.

Interpretive Summary: An assessment was conducted on the potential of mosquito repellents and essential plant oils for managing the Asian citrus psyllid. The psyllid is the vector of the bacterium responsible for the serious invasive citrus greening disease. Seven mosquito repellents and nine essential oils were confirmed to repel the psyllid. However, they were not 100% repellent and they were too toxic to citrus to consider them as direct plant sprays. The results indicated the deterrents as tested hold little potential as a major tactic for reducing psyllid infestations in citrus.

Technical Abstract: This study objectives were to evaluate mosquito repellents against Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) and to expand our knowledge of the potential of essential plant oils as deterrents of adult infestations. Twenty-two candidate deterrents were tested as 20% solutions in methanol using a laboratory assay. Greenhouse evaluations were conducted of ACP colonization of citrus seedlings sprayed with 5 or 25% solutions of eight deterrents. Seven mosquito repellents and nine essential oils were confirmed to reduce ACP infestations in the lab, with average reductions of 74%. Few ACP colonized seedlings sprayed with 25% solutions, but this was attributed to phytotoxicity. Infestations were reduced on seedlings treated with 5% solutions, but these reductions also were attributed to phytotoxicity. Although check seedlings were in close proximity, adults found these plants and laid relatively large numbers of eggs. Although some of the mosquito repellents and essential plant oils deterred infestations, none were completely effective and 5 to 25% solutions were too phytotoxic to consider them as direct plant sprays. Unsprayed seedlings in close proximity to treated plants still became infested. These results indicated the deterrents as tested hold little potential as a major tactic for reducing ACP infestations in citrus.