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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mayaguez, Puerto Rico » Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #344251

Research Project: Genetic Enhancement of Common Bean Using Exotic Germplasm for Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Release of ‘Hermosa’ Black Bean Cultivar

Author
item BEAVER, JAMES - University Of Puerto Rico
item ESTEVEZ DE JENSEN, CONSUELO - University Of Puerto Rico
item RUIZ-QUILES, LUIS - University Of Puerto Rico
item VASQUEZ, GIOANNY - University Of Puerto Rico
item GONZALEZ, ABIEZER - University Of Puerto Rico
item MARTINEZ, HECTOR - University Of Puerto Rico
item Porch, Timothy - Tim

Submitted to: Journal of Agriculture of the University of Puerto Rico
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/25/2019
Publication Date: 6/25/2018
Citation: 8eaver, J., Estevez De Jensen, C., Ruiz-Quiles, L., Vasquez, G., Gonzalez, A., Martinez, H., Porch, T.G. 2018. Release of ‘Hermosa’ Black Bean Cultivar. Journal of Agriculture of the University of Puerto Rico. 102:123-128.

Interpretive Summary: Black beans are widely consumed in Puerto Rico and other Caribbean countries. The U.S. Census Bureau reported that 1,356,420 kg of black beans were imported from the United States in 2012 having a value of $1,458,000. At present, there are no black bean varieties formally released in Puerto Rico for local production. The objective of this research was to develop a locally-adapted black bean cultivar with resistance to the major diseases in Puerto Rico. Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV), a whitefly transmitted begomovirus, threatens bean production in Central America and the Caribbean. Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) is a seed-borne disease that can cause significant losses in seed yield and quality. In Puerto Rico, bean cultivars such as ‘Morales’ and ‘Verano’ have the bgm and I resistance genes and the SW12 QTL that provide resistance to BGYMV and BCMV. Although Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV), which is endemic in Puerto Rico, can cause a top necrosis reaction in bean cultivars that have an unprotected I gene, the incidence of BCMNV is very low because farmers do not plant susceptible varieties that can serve as a source of infection. Hermosa has resistance to these viruses and resistance to common bacterial blight, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Smith) Vauterin et al., and web blight, caused by Thanatephorus cucumeris (Frank) Donk (anamorph: Rhizoctonia solani Kühn), that are serious diseases of common beans planted in the humid tropics. This multiple stress tolerant cultivar is the first black bean cultivar released in Puerto Rico that could result in increased production of this market class.

Technical Abstract: Black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are widely consumed in Puerto Rico and other Caribbean countries. The U.S. Census Bureau (2012) reported that 1,356,420 kg of black beans were imported from the United States in 2012 having a value of $1,458,000. At present, there are no black bean varieties formally released in Puerto Rico for local production. The objective of this research was to develop a locally-adapted black bean cultivar with resistance to the major diseases in Puerto Rico. Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV), a whitefly [Bemisisa tabaci (Gennadius)]-transmitted begomovirus, threatens bean production in Central America and the Caribbean (Miklas et al., 2006; Coyne et al., 2003). Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) is a seed-borne disease that can cause significant losses in seed yield and quality (Beaver and Osorno, 2009). In Puerto Rico, bean cultivars such as ‘Morales’ (Beaver and Miklas, 1999) and ‘Verano’ (Beaver et al., 2008) have the bgm and I resistance genes and the SW12 QTL that provide resistance to BGYMV and BCMV. Although Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV), which is endemic in Puerto Rico, can cause a top necrosis reaction in bean cultivars that have an unprotected I gene (Kelly et al., 1994) the incidence of BCMNV is very low because farmers do not plant susceptible varieties that can serve as a source of infection. Common bacterial blight, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli (Smith) Vauterin et al., and web blight, caused by Thanatephorus cucumeris (Frank) Donk (anamorph: Rhizoctonia solani Kühn) are serious diseases of common beans planted in the humid tropics (Beaver et al., 2012; Zapata et al., 2011).