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ARS Home » Plains Area » Brookings, South Dakota » Integrated Cropping Systems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #343069

Research Project: Productive Cropping Systems Based on Ecological Principles of Pest Management

Location: Integrated Cropping Systems Research

Title: Mind your elders: wild soybean’s contribution to soybean aphid resistance

Author
item Conzemius, Sophia - SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Hesler, Louis
item Varenhorst, Adam - SOUTH DAKOTA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Tilmon, Kelley - THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/15/2017
Publication Date: 11/6/2017
Citation: Conzemius, S., Hesler, L.S., Varenhorst, A., Tilmon, K. 2017. Mind your elders: wild soybean’s contribution to soybean aphid resistance [abstract]. Entomological Society of America meeting, Denver, CO Nov. 5-8, 2017. Available: https://esa.confex.com/esa/2017/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/125755.

Interpretive Summary: Currently, biotype 4 is the most virulent soybean aphid (SBA) biotype known and has become the greatest challenge in utilizing plant resistance in soybean. Wild soybean is proving to be an invaluable resource in the development of new SBA-resistant soybean cultivars. In this study, 20 SBA-resistant wild soybean lines were tested against three colonies of SBA biotype 4. Screening tests identified several lines with promising resistance to all three aphid colonies. Follow-up tests confined wild soybean individually with aphids, revealing significant variation in colony reactions to some wild soybean lines. These results have identified several wild soybean lines with resistance to SBA biotype 4 for soybean breeding. However, differences between colony performance among the three colonies may indicate a more complex interaction between SBA and resistant soybean.

Technical Abstract: Currently, biotype 4 soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsamura, SBA) is the most virulent SBA biotype. Overcoming the most aphid resistant genes, SBA biotype 4 has become the greatest challenge in utilizing plant resistance in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.]. Soybean’s wild ancestor Glycine soja (Sieb. & Zucc.) is proving to be an invaluable resource to the development of new SBA-resistant soybean cultivars. In this study, twenty SBA-resistant wild soybean genotypes were tested against three iso-female colonies of SBA biotype 4. Screening tests identified several lines showing promising resistance to all three aphid colonies. Follow-up tests confined wild soybean individually with aphids, revealing significant variation in colony reactions to some genotypes. The results of these tests have identified wild soybean genotypes with resistance to SBA biotype 4, promoting the diversification of aphid-resistance for soybean breeding. However, differences between colony performance in the three iso-female colonies may indicate a more complex interaction between SBA and resistant soybean.