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ARS Home » Plains Area » Brookings, South Dakota » Integrated Cropping Systems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342770

Research Project: Productive Cropping Systems Based on Ecological Principles of Pest Management

Location: Integrated Cropping Systems Research

Title: Overview: Risk factors and historic levels of pressure from insect pests of seedling corn, cotton, soybean, and wheat in the U.S.

Author
item Papiernik, Sharon
item Sappington, Thomas
item Luttrell, Randall
item Hesler, Louis
item Allen, Clint

Submitted to: Journal of Integrated Pest Management
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: 8/17/2017
Publication Date: 6/15/2018
Citation: Papiernik, S.K., Sappington, T.W., Luttrell, R.G., Hesler, L.S., Allen, K.C. 2018. Overview: Risk factors and historic levels of pressure from insect pests of seedling corn, cotton, soybean, and wheat in the U.S. Journal of Integrated Pest Management. 9:1. https://doi.org/10.1093/jipm/pmx026.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/jipm/pmx026

Interpretive Summary: Neonicotinoid insecticidal seed treatment is a common and controversial pest management practice. These seed treatments are used to protect major U.S. crops against sporadic insect pests that can damage crop seedlings and decrease crop yields. As the name implies, the incidence and activity of sporadic pests varies year-to-year and field-to-field. A better understanding of factors that influence the risk of economic infestations and extent of crop damage by these pests is needed to target neonicotinoid insecticidal seed treatments use based on expected pest pressure. In a series of papers, we review the distribution, ecology, and historical management of pests targeted by neonicotinoid seed treatments in U.S. corn, soybean, wheat, and cotton. Growers, extension personnel, regulators, and others can use this information to devise region- and field-specific management practices that reduce the risks and increase the benefits of neonicotinoid seed treatments.

Technical Abstract: The use of neonicotinoid insecticides in the U.S. has grown by about a factor of four since the mid-2000s. Seed treatments account for a significant fraction of overall insecticide application to crops and a large proportion of major U.S. crops are now planted using seed treated with neonicotinoids. Neonicotinoid insecticidal seed treatments are primarily intended to protect crops against sporadic or minor early-season pests. A better understanding of factors that influence the risk of economic infestations and extent of crop damage by sporadic pests is needed to target neonicotinoid insecticidal seed treatments use based on expected pest pressure. In a series of papers, we review the distribution, ecology, and historical management of sporadic seed and seedling pests targeted by neonicotinoid seed treatments in U.S. corn (Zea mays), soybean (Glycine max), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.). This information is key to region-specific management practices that reduce the risks and increase the benefits of neonicotinoid seed treatments.