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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Newark, Delaware » Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #342745

Research Project: Biological Control of Invasive Wood-Boring Insect Pests such as Emerald Ash Borer and Asian Longhorned Beetle

Location: Beneficial Insects Introduction Research Unit

Title: Host selection and potential non-target risk of Dastarcus helophoroides, a larval parasitoid of the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis

Author
item RIM, KAITLIN - UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE
item GOLEC, JULIAN - UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE
item Duan, Jian

Submitted to: Biological Control
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 5/16/2018
Publication Date: 5/17/2018
Citation: Rim, K., Golec, J., Duan, J.J. 2018. Host selection and potential non-target risk of Dastarcus helophoroides, a larval parasitoid of the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis. Biological Control. 123:120-126. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocontrol.2018.05.012.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocontrol.2018.05.012

Interpretive Summary: Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) is a highly invasive forest pest that has established small populations in the United States, Canada and several countries in Europe. If not eradicated or controlled in the newly invaded regions, this beetle will devastate U.S. forest ecosystems by feeding on over 100 species of hardwood trees. A parasitic beetle (Dastarcus helophoroides) is an important natural enemy of ALB and other longhorned beetles in Asia, where it has been used as a biocontrol agent against these tree pests. To understand the host selection behavior and potential environmental risk of this natural enemy if it is ever introduced against ALB in the U.S., USDA ARS scientists and University of Delaware graduate students compared responses of this parasitic beetle to its native host, ALB, and a non-host, the emerald ash borer (EAB). Our results showed that host selection by this parasitic beetle is influenced both by the host’s suitability for larval development and by the host’s habitat. Although an alternate host such as EAB may be suitable for development, its habitat and feeding behavior may offer protection against attack by this parasitic beetle.

Technical Abstract: Quarantine and eradication measures for the invasive Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) (ALB) are costly and unsustainable. Research has been initiated to investigate the potential use of a co-evolved Asian parasitoid Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae). To understand the host habitat, selection behavior, and non-target risk of this parasitoid, we exposed D. helophoroides to its native host, ALB, and a non-host surrogate, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) (EAB), naturally or artificially inserted in their host plant (twigs). Gravid D. helophoroides oviposited on artificially infested host substrates, and the parasitoid larvae subsequently located, parasitized, and developed on both ALB and EAB. However, D. helophoroides laid fewer eggs, and location and parasitization of naturally infested EAB was significantly reduced. Results suggest that host selection is not only affected by the host’s suitability for larval development, but also influenced by the host’s habitat. Moreover, findings indicate that although buprestid larvae may be suitable for development, their host habitat and feeding behavior may prevent successful attack by D. helophoroides.