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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Wapato, Washington » Temperate Tree Fruit and Vegetable Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #341813

Research Project: Systems Approach for Managing Emerging Insect Pests and Insect-Transmitted Pathogens of Potatoes

Location: Temperate Tree Fruit and Vegetable Research

Title: Potato psyllid vector of zebra chip disease in Pacific Northwest

Author
item Rondon, Silvia - Oregon State University
item Schreiber, Alan - Agriculture Development Group, Inc
item Hamm, Philip - Oregon State University
item Olsen, Nora - University Of Idaho
item Wenninger, Erik - University Of Idaho
item Wohleb, Carrie - Washington State University
item Waters, Tim - Washington State University
item Cooper, William - Rodney
item Walenta, Darrin - Oregon State University
item Reitz, Stuart - Oregon State University

Submitted to: Extension Publications
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/5/2017
Publication Date: 6/5/2017
Citation: Rondon, S., Schreiber, A., Hamm, P., Olsen, N., Wenninger, E., Wohleb, C., Waters, T., Cooper, W.R., Walenta, D., Reitz, S. 2017. Potato psyllid vector of zebra chip disease in Pacific Northwest. Extension Publications. PNW 633.

Interpretive Summary: Zebra chip is a destructive disease of potatoes in the Pacific Northwest and other potato production regions of North America. The pathogen associated with this disease is transmitted by the potato psyllid. A team of researchers which included a scientist at the ARS in Wapato, WA updated an extension publication on the biology and ecology of potato psyllid, epidemiology of the zebra chip pathogen, and management strategies to lessen the impacts of zebra chip in commercial potato fields. This updated publication will help growers make informed management decisions.

Technical Abstract: Zebra chip is a destructive disease of potatoes in the Pacific Northwest and other potato production regions of North America. The pathogen associated with this disease is transmitted by the potato psyllid. A team of researchers which included a scientist at the ARS in Wapato, WA updated an extension publication on the biology and ecology of potato psyllid, epidemiology of the zebra chip pathogen, and management strategies to lessen the impacts of zebra chip in commercial potato fields. This updated publication will help growers make informed management decisions.