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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mayaguez, Puerto Rico » Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #341671

Research Project: Genetic Enhancement of Common Bean Using Exotic Germplasm for Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Selection of common bean to broad environmental adaptation in Haiti

Author
item Colbert, Raphael - Ministry Of Agriculture-Haiti
item Joseph, Carl Didier - Ministry Of Agriculture-Haiti
item Porch, Timothy - Tim
item Rosas, Juan Carlos - Zamorano, Panamerican School Of Agriculture
item Beaver, James - Agricultural Experiment Station, Puerto Rico

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/30/2017
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars in Haiti need adaptation to a broad range of environments and resistance to the most important diseases such as Bean Golden Yellow Mosaic Virus. The Legume Breeding Program (LBP), a collaborative effort of the AREA project (USAID funded through IFAS/University of Florida) and Université Quisqueya, evaluated elite breeding lines from the Legume Innovation Lab project (S01.A4) to identify potential parental lines and improved varieties having traits of economic value. During 2016, un-fertilized field trials were conducted during the winter months at Cabaret, a lowland (32 masl) environment, and during the summer months at Kenscoff, a highland (1,800 masl) environment. In Cabaret, 212 lines from three market classes (black, red, and red mottled) were planted using a randomized complete block design with two replications. Sixty-four lines yielded = 1,000 kg/ha and had resistant disease scores. These lines were grown in Kenscoff using the same experimental design. Among the selections that exceeded the one-ton threshold at Cabaret (national average yield is 600 kg/ha), 25 lines yielded between 1.3 and 1.9 t ha-1 at Kenscoff. Twenty lines were selected for further evaluation and use in the breeding program. Red mottled lines had an average 100-seed weight of 32 g whereas seed weights of black and small red lines averaged 22 g. Small red and black bean lines had less leafhopper damage than red mottled lines. In the lowland environment, the lines reached physiological maturity approximately 72 days after planting while in the highland environment reaching this stage of development needed 20 more days. In conclusion, the selected lines showed broad adaptation to the agroecological zones of Haiti. The most promising lines were used as parents to generate F1. Further tests are ongoing in alkaline and salty soils as well as in an intermediate altitude (900-1200 m).

Technical Abstract: Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars in Haiti need adaptation to a broad range of environments and resistance to the most important diseases such as Bean Golden Yellow Mosaic Virus. The Legume Breeding Program (LBP), a collaborative effort of the AREA project (USAID funded through IFAS/University of Florida) and Université Quisqueya, evaluated elite breeding lines from the Legume Innovation Lab project (S01.A4) to identify potential parental lines and improved varieties having traits of economic value. During 2016, un-fertilized field trials were conducted during the winter months at Cabaret, a lowland (32 masl) environment, and during the summer months at Kenscoff, a highland (1,800 masl) environment. In Cabaret, 212 lines from three market classes (black, red, and red mottled) were planted using a randomized complete block design with two replications. Sixty-four lines yielded = 1,000 kg/ha and had resistant disease scores. These lines were grown in Kenscoff using the same experimental design. Among the selections that exceeded the one-ton threshold at Cabaret (national average yield is 600 kg/ha), 25 lines yielded between 1.3 and 1.9 t ha-1 at Kenscoff. Twenty lines were selected for further evaluation and use in the breeding program. Red mottled lines had an average 100-seed weight of 32 g whereas seed weights of black and small red lines averaged 22 g. Small red and black bean lines had less leafhopper damage than red mottled lines. In the lowland environment, the lines reached physiological maturity approximately 72 days after planting while in the highland environment reaching this stage of development needed 20 more days. In conclusion, the selected lines showed broad adaptation to the agroecological zones of Haiti. The most promising lines were used as parents to generate F1. Further tests are ongoing in alkaline and salty soils as well as in an intermediate altitude (900-1200 m).