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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mayaguez, Puerto Rico » Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #341505

Research Project: Genetic Enhancement of Common Bean Using Exotic Germplasm for Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Development, release and dissemination of "Sankara" black bean in Haiti

Author
item Prophete, Emmanuel - Ministry Of Agriculture-Haiti
item Demosthene, Gasner - Ministry Of Agriculture-Haiti
item Rosas, J. - Zamorano, Panamerican School Of Agriculture
item Miklas, Phillip - Phil
item Beaver, J. - University Of Puerto Rico
item Porch, Timothy - Tim

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/30/2017
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in the Caribbean is threatened by Bean Golden Yellow Mosaic Virus (BGYMV), Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) and Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (BCMNV). The University of Puerto Rico, the University of Nebraska, the USDA-ARS, Zamorano and the National Seed Service of the Republic of Haiti collaborated in the development and release of ‘Sankara’ black bean. Sankara is a black bean with an upright indeterminate growth habit. It reaches maturity approximately 65 days after planting. Sankara had earlier maturity than the cultivar ‘DPC-40’ when evaluated in Haiti during the summer months. Sankara produced a mean yield of 2,014 kg/ha when tested in 12 field trials in Haiti, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico. It has multiple genes for resistance to BGYMV and to BCMV and BCMNV. Dr. Phil Miklas observed that Sankara was well adapted when planted in Prosser, WA. During 2016, Sankara produced a mean seed yield of 2,722 kg/ha in trials planted in the U.S. and Canada. During 2015, Dr. Phil Miklas produced at Prosser, WA approximately 450 kg of breeder seed of Sankara. With support from the USAID/USDA PASA program for Haiti and the FtF-ARS Grain Legume Project, seed of Sankara was multiplied during the summer of 2016 by Basin Seed Company in Nampa, Idaho. A container with 11,364 kg of high quality, disease-free seed of Sankara arrived in Port-au-Prince in November 2016. This seed was planted on approximately 190 ha and is expected to produce 200 MT of seed for farmers who plant beans on the hillsides during the summer months. Sankara was also released in Honduras as ‘Azabache 40’.

Technical Abstract: Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in the Caribbean is threatened by Bean Golden Yellow Mosaic Virus (BGYMV), Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) and Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (BCMNV). The University of Puerto Rico, the University of Nebraska, the USDA-ARS, Zamorano and the National Seed Service of the Republic of Haiti collaborated in the development and release of ‘Sankara’ black bean (Beaver et al., 2014. J. of Agric. of the Univ. of Puerto Rico 98:83-87). Sankara is a black bean with an upright indeterminate growth habit. It reaches maturity approximately 65 days after planting. Sankara had earlier maturity than the cultivar ‘DPC-40’ when evaluated in Haiti during the summer months. Sankara produced a mean yield of 2,014 kg/ha when tested in 12 field trials in Haiti, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico. It has the bgm-1 gene and SW12 QTL for resistance to BGYMV and the I and bc-3 genes for resistance to BCMV and BCMNV. Dr. Phil Miklas observed that Sankara was well adapted when planted in Prosser, WA. During 2016, Sankara produced a mean seed yield of 2,722 kg/ha in trials planted in the U.S. and Canada. During 2015, Dr. Phil Miklas produced at Prosser, WA approximately 450 kg of breeder seed of Sankara. With support from the USAID/USDA PASA program for Haiti and the FtF-ARS Grain Legume Project, seed of Sankara was multiplied during the summer of 2016 by Basin Seed Company in Nampa, Idaho. A container with 11,364 kg of high quality, disease-free seed of Sankara arrived in Port-au-Prince in November 2016. This seed was planted on approximately 190 ha and is expected to produce 200 MT of seed for farmers who plant beans on the hillsides during the summer months. Sankara was also released in Honduras as ‘Azabache 40’.