Skip to main content
ARS Home » Northeast Area » Kearneysville, West Virginia » Appalachian Fruit Research Laboratory » Innovative Fruit Production, Improvement, and Protection » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #340120

Research Project: Integrated Orchard Management and Automation for Deciduous Tree Fruit Crops

Location: Innovative Fruit Production, Improvement, and Protection

Title: Impact of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug in North America and Europe: history, biology, ecology, and management

Author
item Leskey, Tracy
item Nielsen, Anne - Rutgers University

Submitted to: Annual Review of Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 7/6/2017
Publication Date: 10/25/2017
Citation: Leskey, T.C., Nielsen, A.L. 2017. Impact of the invasive brown marmorated stink bug in North America and Europe: history, biology, ecology, and management. Annual Review Of Entomology. 63:599-618. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043226.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-ento-020117-043226

Interpretive Summary: Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is an invasive stink bug species from Asia that has been introduced to the USA, Canada, and multiple European countries. In 2010, BMSB populations in the mid-Atlantic region caused severe damage to tree fruit including apples and peaches as well as vegetables, soybeans, and ornamentals. Large numbers of adults caused serious nuisance as they invaded homes and businesses in the fall. BMSB feeds on over 170 host plants, can move between farms and across the landscape easily, and is capable of producing many offspring leading to large populations. Fortunately, a greater understanding of BMSB biology and ecology has led to the development of sustainable tactics for its management in vulnerable crops. However, much is still unknown about BMSB and the need for continued long term collaborative studies is critical to managing this serious invasive species.

Technical Abstract: Brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys (Stål), is an invasive Pentatomidae introduced to the USA, Canada, and multiple European countries. In 2010, BMSB populations in the mid-Atlantic region USA reached outbreak levels, and subsequent feeding resulted in severe damage to tree fruit as well as other crops. Significant nuisance issues from adults overwintering inside homes were common. BMSB is an r-selected highly polyphagous species with a strong dispersal capacity and high reproductive output, potentially enabling its spread and success in invaded regions. A greater understanding of BMSB biology and ecology, and its natural enemies, identification of the male-produced aggregation pheromone, and recognition that BMSB disperses into crops from adjacent wooded habitat has led to the development of behaviorally-based IPM tactics. However, much is still unknown about BMSB, and continued long term collaborative studies are necessary to refine of crop-specific IPM programs and enhance biological control across invaded landscapes.