Skip to main content
ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Plant Germplasm Introduction and Testing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #339771

Research Project: Management of Plant Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: Plant Germplasm Introduction and Testing Research

Title: Fungal plant pathogens associated with emerging crops in North America: An emerging challenge for plant health professionals

Author
item Dugan, Frank
item Lupien, Shari
item Hu, Jinguo

Submitted to: Plant Health Progress
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/22/2017
Publication Date: 12/22/2017
Citation: Dugan, F.M., Lupien, S.L., Hu, J. 2017. Fungal plant pathogens associated with emerging crops in North America: An emerging challenge for plant health professionals. Plant Health Progress. 18:221-229.

Interpretive Summary: The term 'emerging crops' is typically applied to crops targeting niche markets. The crops are often raised by and sold to immigrant populations, although there are other producers and consumers of these crops. Diseases, including fungal diseases, of these crops are often inadequately documented. This brief review describes this situation, and provides in summary and/or tabular form names of crops, their diseases, and literature for diagnosis and/or management.

Technical Abstract: 'Emerging crops' is a term typically applied to ethnic food plants, or plants used in traditional or ethnic medicine, some of which are becoming viable niche markets in North America. Information on crop protection of these plants is often scarce to lacking. Literature providing information on diagnosis and management of fungal diseases of these crops in North America is concisely reviewed. Emphasis is placed on crops comprising recent niche markets for Asian, African, Oceanian or Latino immigrants. Emerging crops are often tied to economic activities of immigrant populations. Crops of immigrants from Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Oceania are contrasted with crops of immigrants of European origins, plants usually familiar to North American plant health professionals, and with Native American food and medicinal plants, some of which are experiencing a renaissance as emerging crops.