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ARS Home » Plains Area » Grand Forks, North Dakota » Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center » Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #336063

Research Project: Food Factors to Prevent Obesity and Related Diseases

Location: Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research

Title: Effect of delta-tocotrienols and green tea polyphenols on high-fat-diet-induced bone deterioration in male C57BL/6J mice

Author
item Shen, Chwan-li - Texas Tech University
item Tomison, Michael - Texas Tech University
item Kaur, Gurvinder - Texas Tech University
item Ramalingam, Latha - Texas Tech University
item Dufour, Jannette - Texas Tech University
item Moustaid-moussa, Naima - Texas Tech University
item Chung, Eunhee - University Of Texas At San Antonio
item Mo, Huanbiao - Georgia State University
item Cao, Jay

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/1/2016
Publication Date: 4/1/2017
Citation: Shen, C., Tomison, M.D., Kaur, G., Ramalingam, L., Dufour, J., Moustaid-Moussa, N., Chung, E., Mo, H., Cao, J.J. 2017. Effect of delta-tocotrienols and green tea polyphenols on high-fat-diet-induced bone deterioration in male C57BL/6J mice [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 31:139.5.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Our previous studies demonstrated an osteo-protective roles for tocotrienols (TT, extracted from annatto consisting of 90% delta-TT and 10% gamma TT) and green tea polyphenols (GTP, extracted from green tea) in obese animals. This study further examined the combined effects of TT with GTP on high-fat-diet (HFD) induced bone deterioration in obese male mice. Forty male C57BL/6J mice were assigned to 4 groups (n=10/group) in a 2 (no TT vs. TT) × 2 (no GTP vs. GTP) factorial design: HFD, HFD+TT (400 mg TT/kg diet), HFD+GTP [0.5% (w/v) in drinking water], and HFD+TT+GTP for 14 weeks. The results showed that either TT or GTP supplementation lowered fasting glucose concentration based on glucose tolerance test, while only GTP supplementation lowered blood glucose concentration based on insulin tolerance test, with no change in caloric intake. GTP supplementation increased serum procollagen type I intact N-terminal (a bone formation marker) and there was an interaction between TT and GTP on lowering serum collagen type I cross-linked C-telopeptide (a bone resorption marker). TT supplementation increased the total area, bone area, and bone volume (BV) at the femur midshaft. GTP supplementation increased the BV, bone volume/total volume (BV/TV), and connectivity density at the 2nd lumbar vertebrae. GTP supplementation increased trabecular number and tended to increase BV/TV (p=0.08), and decreased trabecular separation at the distal femur. However, TT supplementation tended to increase BV (p=0.10), BV/TV (p=0.06), and trabecular thickness (p=0.10) at distal femur. There was a synergistic interaction between TT and GTP on BV/TV trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) at the femur midshaft, resulting in the lowest values of BV/TV and Tb.Th in HFD group. This study suggests a potentially significant prophylactic role of TT and green tea in bone health of obese animals.