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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Wapato, Washington » Temperate Tree Fruit and Vegetable Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #335442

Research Project: Systems Approach for Managing Emerging Insect Pests and Insect-Transmitted Pathogens of Potatoes

Location: Temperate Tree Fruit and Vegetable Research

Title: Collection of salivary proteins of psyllids (Hemiptera: Psylloidea)

Author
item Jimenez, Floricel - Heritage University
item Cooper, William - Rodney
item Garczynski, Stephen
item Puterka, Gary
item Barcenas, Nina - Heritage University

Submitted to: Journal of Entomological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/8/2017
Publication Date: 6/26/2017
Citation: Jimenez, F., Cooper, W.R., Garczynski, S.F., Puterka, G.J., Barcenas, N. 2017. Collection of salivary proteins of psyllids (Hemiptera: Psylloidea). Journal of Entomological Science. 52:201-206.

Interpretive Summary: Salivary proteins have important roles in feeding by insects, but there are currently no published studies on the salivary proteins of psyllids. Scientists at the USDA-ARS in Wapato, WA and Stillwater, OK, and at Heritage University in Toppenish, WA developed methods to collect large quantities of salivary proteins from potato psyllid and pear psylla. These methods will allow researchers to collect and analyze salivary proteins of psyllid pests, which will lead to a better understanding of how psyllids feed and and transmit plant pathogens.

Technical Abstract: Phloem-feeding insects discharge into the phloem of host plants copious amounts of enzymatically active saliva which prevents phloem occlusion and suppresses plant defenses. Although previous reports have documented the composition and roles of salivary proteins from aphids, there are no published studies on the saliva of any psyllid species. To support future studies on the salivary proteins of psyllid pests, the objective of our study was to develop methods of collecting large quantities of salivary proteins from psyllids. Results of a series of bioassays demonstrated that potato psyllid and pear psylla both preferentially feed on 30% sucrose compared with other sucrose concentrations, and that the addition of amino acids or sorbitol to sucrose did not increase psyllid feeding rates. Salivary proteins from 7500 potato psyllid adults were then concentrated and observed using SDS-PAGE, demonstrating that psyllids actively discharge salivary proteins into the artificial diet while feeding. A more comprehensive analysis of psyllid salivary proteins using our collection methods will lead to a better understanding of psyllid/plant interactions, and of transmission of plant pathogens including Liberibacter and Phytoplasma.