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ARS Home » Plains Area » Houston, Texas » Children's Nutrition Research Center » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #330549

Research Project: Childhood Obesity Prevention

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Relating use of effective responsive, structure, and non-directive control vegetable parenting practices to subscales from the Model of Goal Directed Behavior

Author
item Diep, Cassandra - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)
item Beltran, Alicia - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)
item Chen, Tzu - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)
item Thompson, Deborah - Debbe
item O'connor, Teresia - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)
item Hughes, Sheryl - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)
item Baranowski, Janice - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)
item Baranowski, Tom - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)

Submitted to: International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/17/2016
Publication Date: 6/17/2016
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/62758
Citation: Diep, C.S., Beltran, A., Chen, T.A., Thompson, D.J., O'Connor, T., Hughes, S., Baranowski, J., Baranowski, T. 2016. Relating use of effective responsive, structure, and non-directive control vegetable parenting practices to subscales from the Model of Goal Directed Behavior. International Journal of Child Health and Nutrition. 5(2):45-55.

Interpretive Summary: Interventions to increase parents' use of effective parenting practices to increase their child's vegetable consumption requires an understanding of the influences on using them. The Model of Goal Directed Behavior (MGDB) identifies a comprehensive set of variables thought to influence behavior. This study tested whether MGDB variables were related to each of the three different types of parenting practices in regard to child vegetable intake among 307 parents of preschool children. Habit was a consistent predictor of each type of parenting practices. Interventions in this area would benefit from procedures known to increase the likelihood of forming a habit of parenting practices for increasing child vegetable intake.

Technical Abstract: Parents may positively influence children's vegetable consumption through effective vegetable parenting practices (VPP). Research has demonstrated three dimensions of effective VPP: Effective Responsiveness, Structure, and Non-Directive Control, but there is limited research investigating each separately. This study presents the modeling of Effective Responsive, Structure, and Non-Directive Control VPP using constructs from the Model of Goal Directed Vegetable Parenting Practices (MGDVPP). Parents (n=307) completed a survey on demographics, MGDVPP constructs, and effective VPP. Block regression modeling tested three models: one for each dimension of effective VPP as the dependent variable. Independent variables included validated subscales representing MGDVPP constructs: Intention, Desire, Perceived Barriers, Autonomy, Relatedness, Self-Efficacy, Habit, Anticipated Emotions, Perceived Behavioral Control, Attitudes, and Norms. Participants were racially diverse, and a majority was female, of higher socioeconomic status, and with a male child. Effective Responsive VPP was positively related to a Habit subscale. Effective Structure VPP was positively related to a Barrier, two Habit, and an Attitude subscales. Effective Non-Directive Control VPP was positively related to being a high school or GED graduate, having younger children, a Habit, and two Intentions subscales, and negatively related to an Intentions and a Perceived Behavioral Control subscales. The adjusted R2 for the Effective Responsive, Structure, and Non-Directive Control VPP models were 0.432, 0.310, and 0.515, respectively. This was the first study to relate constructs from a theoretical model to effective VPP dimensions. Research is needed to longitudinally assess the MGDVPP and test its utility in vegetable-related interventions.