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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Griffin, Georgia » Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #327486

Research Project: Conservation, Characterization, and Evaluation of Plant Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit

Title: Development of DNA markers for newly identified high-oleate peanut mutants

Author
item Wang, Ming
item Tonnis, Brandon
item Chen, Zhenbang - University Of Georgia
item Chen, Charles - Auburn University
item Pederson, Gary

Submitted to: American Peanut Research and Education Society Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/22/2016
Publication Date: 7/14/2016
Citation: Wang, M.L., Tonnis, B.D., Chen, Z., Chen, C., Pederson, G.A. 2016. Development of DNA markers for newly identified high-oleate peanut mutants. American Peanut Research and Education Society Abstracts. Paper No. 33.

Interpretive Summary: Development of high-oleate cultivars is one of the important objectives of peanut breeding because consuming products containing high oleate can benefit human health in many aspects. By screening the entire USDA cultivated peanut collection, we have identified two new high-oleate mutants containing 80% oleic acid in seeds. Both mutant lines contained a substitution of G448A in FAD2A and a substitution of C301G in FAD2B. Our mutants do not have flowers on the main stem (subspecies hypogaea), but a previously identified natural high-oleate mutant ‘F435’ does have flowers on the main stem (subspecies fastigiata). Therefore, we have identified a class of natural mutants from the subspecies hypogaea and provided breeders with new additional genetic resources to use for developing high-oleate cultivars. Utilizing new mutant lines to develop high-oleta cultivars may help to broaden their genetic diversity and reduce their vulnerability in peanut cultivation. Previously our laboratory developed genotyping assays for identifying high-oleate peanuts in molecular breeding programs by real-time PCR and allele-specific PCR platforms. To facilitate peanut molecular breeding, we are developing a real-time PCR genotyping assay for the newly identified mutants. Instead of detecting one substitution on FAD2A and one insertion on FAD2B, the new genotyping assay will detect one substitution each on FAD2A and FAD2B, respectively.

Technical Abstract: Development of high-oleate cultivars is one of the important objectives of peanut breeding because consuming products containing high oleate can benefit human health in many aspects. By screening the entire USDA cultivated peanut collection, we have identified two new high-oleate mutants (PI 342664 and PI 342666 containing 80% oleic acid in seeds). Both mutant lines contained a substitution of G448A in FAD2A and a substitution of C301G in FAD2B. Our mutants do not have flowers on the main stem (subspecies hypogaea), but a previously identified natural high-oleate mutant ‘F435’ does have flowers on the main stem (subspecies fastigiata). Therefore, we have identified a class of natural mutants from the subspecies hypogaea and provided breeders with new additional genetic resources to use for developing high-oleate cultivars. Utilizing new mutant lines to develop high-oleta cultivars may help to broaden their genetic diversity and reduce their vulnerability in peanut cultivation. Previously our laboratory developed genotyping assays for identifying high-oleate peanuts in molecular breeding programs by real-time PCR and allele-specific PCR platforms. To facilitate peanut molecular breeding, we are developing a real-time PCR genotyping assay for the newly identified mutants. Instead of detecting one substitution on FAD2A and one insertion on FAD2B, the new genotyping assay will detect one substitution each on FAD2A and FAD2B, respectively. The detailed results will be reported on the meeting.