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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mayaguez, Puerto Rico » Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #327427

Research Project: Genetic Solutions for the Sustainable Intensification of Common Bean Production in Low-Input, Small-Holder Agricultural Systems

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Genome-wide association studies of morphological and agronomical traits in cultivated tepary beans (Phaseolus acutifolius)

Author
item Hart, John
item Vargas, Ana - University Of Puerto Rico
item Brick, M - Colorado State University
item Burridge, Jimmy - Pennsylvania State University
item Beaver, J - University Of Puerto Rico
item Porch, Timothy - Tim

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/11/2016
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Tepary bean is adapted to high temperature arid agroecological zones. In light of the ongoing and rapid changes in the world climate, the evaluation and development of alternate grain legume species that have similar nutritional and culinary characteristics as common bean, such as tepary bean, is needed to enhance food security in existing marginal environments and in preparation for a hotter, drier future. One hundred and fifty two cultivated accessions from the Tepary Diversity Panel (TDP), composed of a total of 315 domesticated and wild tepary accessions available from the USDA and CIAT collections, were evaluated in Puerto Rico, Colorado, and Arizona for yield, agronomic, leaf, and seed traits. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were conducted on these phenotypes and 18,500 SNPs that resulted from genotyping-by-sequencing and alignment to the common bean reference genome. These studies resulted in the identification of quantitative trait loci for morphological and agronomic traits. Tepary bean accessions with superior yield performance under abiotic stress and with improved disease resistance, seed quality and agronomic performance are being incorporated into the tepary breeding program at ARS-TARS, while specific traits are being considered for the development, validation, and application of marker assisted selection. Superior accessions and breeding lines are being tested further for potential release in East Africa and Latin America in a freely available Tepary Adaptation Trial (TAT).

Technical Abstract: Tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray) is adapted to high temperature arid agroecological zones. In light of the ongoing and rapid changes in the world climate, the evaluation and development of alternate grain legume species that have similar nutritional and culinary characteristics as common bean, such as tepary bean, is needed to enhance food security in existing marginal environments and in preparation for a hotter, drier future. One hundred and fifty two cultivated accessions from the Tepary Diversity Panel (TDP), composed of a total of 315 domesticated and wild P. acutifolius accessions available from the USDA and CIAT collections, were evaluated in Puerto Rico, Colorado, and Arizona for yield, agronomic, leaf, and seed traits. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were conducted on these phenotypes and 18,500 SNPs that resulted from ApeKI genotyping-by-sequencing and alignment to the P. vulgaris reference genome. These studies resulted in the identification of quantitative trait loci for morphological and agronomic traits. Tepary bean accessions with superior yield performance under abiotic stress and with improved disease resistance, seed quality and agronomic performance are being incorporated into the tepary breeding program at ARS-TARS, while specific traits are being considered for the development, validation, and application of marker assisted selection. Superior accessions and breeding lines are being tested further for potential production in East Africa and Latin America in a freely available Tepary Adaptation Trial (TAT).