Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mayaguez, Puerto Rico » Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #327425

Research Project: Development and implementation of robust molecular markers and genetic improvement of common and tepary beans in Central America and Haiti

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Evaluation of common bean lines for adaptation to high temperatures in Honduras

Author
item Rosas, J - Escuela Agricola Panamericana
item Beaver, J - University Of Puerto Rico
item Porch, Timothy - Tim
item Beebe, Steve - International Center For Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)
item Burridge, Jimmmy - Pennsylvania State University
item Lynch, J - Pennsylvania State University

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/11/2016
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: As in other regions worldwide, common bean production in Central America and the Caribbean (CA/C) region is threatened by effects of climate change including increasing temperatures and drought due to variable rainfall patterns. One of the main alternatives for increasing adaptation of common beans to high temperatures is through breeding and selection. Therefore, the objective of this research was to identify promising bean lines tolerant to high temperatures with potential for commercial production and for use as breeding parents for genetic improvement of adaptation to heat stress. A wide array of cultivars and promising breeding lines were tested under high temperature conditions by a consortium of bean researchers in CA/C, Africa and the U.S. to identify potential cultivars and breeding parents. The Bean Research Program of Zamorano University evaluated more than 250 bean lines in a series of trials conducted during three planting seasons in 2015 under high temperatures conditions in Nacaome, Honduras. Maximum average temperatures during the summer (Feb-Apr), “primera” (May-Aug) and “postrera” (Oct-Dec) seasons were 37.9, 39.1 and 38.2°C and the minimum average temperatures were 23.0, 24.2 and 24.1°C, respectively. Shoot biomass, pod dry weight (DW), pod partitioning index at the pod-filling stage of development, pod and seed DW, harvest index, seed yield and 100 seed weight at harvest maturity were measured in most trials. Pod formation was monitored from flowering to physiological maturity. More than 30% of 120 lines did not reach physiological maturity due to flower and young pod abortion in the BASE (Bean Adaptation Stress Evaluation) trial conducted in the summer season adequate irrigation. Selected genotypes from the BASE trial, and from four regional trials which are distributed annually through the CA/C Bean Research Network, were evaluated during the “primera” season. Promising heat tolerant genotypes selected from all previous trials were evaluated during the “postrera” season. A small group of heat tolerant lines were identified from these trials conducted in 2015. Some lines also have other desirable agronomic and commercial traits, including virus resistance and excellent quality in the small red and black market classes. The heat tolerant line, SJC 730-79, was recently released as cultivar in El Salvador. Some other promising lines identified as heat tolerant in this study are being tested under farmer conditions for potential release as cultivars in Honduras and other countries of the CA/C region.

Technical Abstract: As in other regions worldwide, common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in Central America and the Caribbean (CA/C) region is threatened by effects of climate change including increasing temperatures and drought due to variable rainfall patterns. One of the main alternatives for increasing adaptation of common beans to high temperatures is through breeding and selection. Therefore, the objective of this research was to identify promising bean lines tolerant to high temperatures with potential for commercial production and for use as breeding parents for genetic improvement of adaptation to heat stress. A wide array of cultivars and promising breeding lines were tested under high temperature conditions by a consortium of bean researchers in CA/C, Africa and the U.S. to identify potential cultivars and breeding parents. The Bean Research Program of Zamorano University evaluated more than 250 bean lines in a series of trials conducted during three planting seasons in 2015 under high temperatures conditions in Nacaome, Honduras. Maximum average temperatures during the summer (Feb-Apr), “primera” (May-Aug) and “postrera” (Oct-Dec) seasons were 37.9, 39.1 and 38.2°C and the minimum average temperatures were 23.0, 24.2 and 24.1°C, respectively. Shoot biomass, pod dry weight (DW), pod partitioning index at the pod-filling stage of development, pod and seed DW, harvest index, seed yield and 100 seed weight at harvest maturity were measured in most trials. Pod formation was monitored from flowering to physiological maturity. More than 30% of 120 lines did not reach physiological maturity due to flower and young pod abortion in the BASE (Bean Adaptation Stress Evaluation) trial conducted in the summer season adequate irrigation. Selected genotypes from the BASE trial, and from four regional trials which are distributed annually through the CA/C Bean Research Network, were evaluated during the “primera” season. Promising heat tolerant genotypes selected from all previous trials were evaluated during the “postrera” season. A small group of heat tolerant lines were identified from these trials conducted in 2015. Some lines also have other desirable agronomic and commercial traits, including virus resistance and excellent quality in the small red and black market classes. The heat tolerant line, SJC 730-79, was recently released as cultivar in El Salvador. Some other promising lines identified as heat tolerant in this study are being tested under farmer conditions for potential release as cultivars in Honduras and other countries of the CA/C region.