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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mayaguez, Puerto Rico » Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #327423

Research Project: Development and implementation of robust molecular markers and genetic improvement of common and tepary beans in Central America and Haiti

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Breeding black beans for Haiti with multiple virus resistance

Author
item Prophete, Emmanuel - Ministry Of Agriculture-Haiti
item Demosthene, Gasner - Ministry Of Agriculture-Haiti
item Beaver, J - University Of Puerto Rico
item Rosas, J - Escuela Agricola Panamericana
item Porch, Timothy - Tim

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/11/2016
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Black bean production in the lowlands of Central America and the Caribbean is threatened by Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV). Therefore, the objective of this research was to develop, test and release tropically-adapted black bean lines with resistance to these viral diseases. Black bean breeding lines from Zamorano, the University of Puerto Rico and CIAT were tested in field trials in Haiti by bean researchers of the National Seed Service (NSS) of the Ministry of Agriculture. ‘DPC-40’ was first BGYMV and BCMNV resistant black bean to be released and disseminated in Haiti. This cultivar was originally developed and released in the Dominican Republic with support from the Dry Grain Pulse CRSP. A USAID funded Bean Technology Dissemination project supported the production and distribution of DPC-40 to small-scale farmers in Haiti. Another BGYMV and BCMNV resistant black bean, ‘XRAV-40-4’, was identified NSS researchers to have earlier maturity than DPC-40.The performance of XRAV-40-4, released as ‘Sankara’, was validated in on-farm trials with support from FAO and in collaboration with NGO’s. The BGYMV and BCMNV resistant black bean line MEN 2201-64 ML was identified by the NSS bean research program to combine earlier maturity and better adaptation to drought. The NSS bean research program continues to evaluate the performance of black bean breeding lines in field trials and on-farm trials. The long-term objectives are to identify black bean lines that combine multiple virus resistance with resistance to rust and greater tolerance to abiotic stresses such as drought and low soil fertility.

Technical Abstract: Black bean production in the lowlands of Central America and the Caribbean is threatened by Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV). Therefore, the objective of this research was to develop, test and release tropically-adapted black bean lines with resistance to these viral diseases. Black bean breeding lines from Zamorano, the University of Puerto Rico and CIAT were tested in field trials in Haiti by bean researchers of the National Seed Service (NSS) of the Ministry of Agriculture. ‘DPC-40’ was first BGYMV and BCMNV resistant black bean to be released and disseminated in Haiti. This cultivar was originally developed and released in the Dominican Republic with support from the Dry Grain Pulse CRSP. A USAID funded Bean Technology Dissemination project supported the production and distribution of DPC-40 to small-scale farmers in Haiti. Another BGYMV and BCMNV resistant black bean, ‘XRAV-40-4’, was identified NSS researchers to have earlier maturity than DPC-40.The performance of XRAV-40-4, released as ‘Sankara’, was validated in on-farm trials with support from FAO and in collaboration with NGO’s. The BGYMV and BCMNV resistant black bean line MEN 2201-64 ML was identified by the NSS bean research program to combine earlier maturity and better adaptation to drought. The NSS bean research program continues to evaluate the performance of black bean breeding lines in field trials and on-farm trials. The long-term objectives are to identify black bean lines that combine multiple virus resistance with resistance to rust and greater tolerance to abiotic stresses such as drought and low soil fertility.