Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mayaguez, Puerto Rico » Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #327422

Research Project: Genetic Solutions for the Sustainable Intensification of Common Bean Production in Low-Input, Small-Holder Agricultural Systems

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Durango diversity panel: abiotic and biotic stress characterization and potential for introducing new germplasm into East Africa

Author
item Trapp, Jennifer - Seneca Foods
item Mafimoghaddan, Samira - North Dakota State University
item Nchimbi, Susan - Sokoine University Of Agriculture
item Porch, Timothy - Tim
item Sankaran, Sidhu - Washington State University
item Khot, Lay - Washington State University
item Mcclean, Phil - North Dakota State University
item Miklas, Phillip - Phil

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/11/2016
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The Durango Diversity Panel (DDP) consists of 192 old and newly released US and Canadian cultivars and germplasm lines in the pinto, great northern, red, and pink bean market classes. The Durango Race provides genetic diversity for drought stress tolerance, and biotic stress resistance. Much disease resistance in the DDP, however, is likely derived from smaller seeded Mesoamerican gene pool introgressions. Commercial potential for the pinto bean market class in Africa is growing but evaluation of pinto beans and other race Durango materials for production in East Africa is needed. In 2015, the DDP was evaluated in Arusha and Mbeya, Tanzania. Yield ranged from 400 to 1600 kg ha-1 and 100 seed weight from 20 to 37 g. Bean rust disease pressure was severe but 15% of the DDP exhibited resistance to the different race complexes across locations. Fourteen DDP lines were selected for on farm trials in Tanzania in 2016. The DDP was planted under separate non-stress, terminal drought, low N, and purgatory stress trials in Washington State (WA) in 2015. Agronomic, root, and remote sensing traits (greenness and thermal imaging) via UAV were collected. About 5% of the DDP exhibited combined abiotic stress tolerance in WA with high yield potential and rust resistance in Tanzania. Preliminary GWAS reveals important genomic regions in the DDP conditioning traits relevant to abiotic stress tolerance and biotic resistance. Collectively, this information will be useful for breeding Durango market class cultivars across continents.

Technical Abstract: The Durango Diversity Panel (DDP) consists of 192 old and newly released US and Canadian cultivars and germplasm lines in the pinto, great northern, red, and pink bean market classes. The Durango Race provides genetic diversity for drought stress tolerance, and biotic stress resistance. Much disease resistance in the DDP, however, is likely derived from smaller seeded Mesoamerican gene pool introgressions. Commercial potential for the pinto bean market class in Africa is growing but evaluation of pinto beans and other race Durango materials for production in East Africa is needed. In 2015, the DDP was evaluated in Arusha and Mbeya, Tanzania. Yield ranged from 400 to 1600 kg ha-1 and 100 seed weight from 20 to 37 g. Bean rust disease pressure was severe but 15% of the DDP exhibited resistance to the different race complexes across locations. Fourteen DDP lines were selected for on farm trials in Tanzania in 2016. The DDP was planted under separate non-stress, terminal drought, low N, and purgatory stress trials in Washington State (WA) in 2015. Agronomic, root, and remote sensing traits (greenness and thermal imaging) via UAV were collected. About 5% of the DDP exhibited combined abiotic stress tolerance in WA with high yield potential and rust resistance in Tanzania. Preliminary GWAS reveals important genomic regions in the DDP conditioning traits relevant to abiotic stress tolerance and biotic resistance. Collectively, this information will be useful for breeding Durango market class cultivars across continents.