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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mayaguez, Puerto Rico » Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #326812

Research Project: Pyramiding elemental traits to accelerate breeding of resilient, more productive beans for smallholder farmers

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Phenotypic evaluation and genome wide association studies of two common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) diversity panels in multiple locations highlight evaluation techniques, traits and lines useful for trait based selection

Author
item Burridge, Jimmy - Pennsylvania State University
item Beaver, James - University Of Puerto Rico
item Beebe, Steve - International Center For Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)
item Jochua, C - Mozambique Agronomic Research Institute
item Masas, A - Mozambique Agronomic Research Institute
item Mcclean, Phillip - North Dakota State University
item Miguel, M - Mozambique Agronomic Research Institute
item Miklas, Phillip - Phil
item Porch, Timothy - Tim
item Lynch, Jonathan - Pennsylvania State University
item Rosas, J - Escuela Agricola Panamericana
item White, Jeffrey

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/11/2016
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) productivity is constrained by abiotic soil conductions including drought and low fertility as well as by high temperature. High temperature primarily impacts pollen viability and growth. Soil water content and nutrients occur heterogeneously and often in a stratified pattern. Multiple shoot and root phenotypes can be used to differentiate and identify genotypes and resistance mechanisms that are related to increased productivity in limiting environments. Phenotypic and/or genetic selection can then be used in a trait based selection and breeding pipeline. We conducted replicated field trails of an Andean and Meso-american common bean diversity panels in 6 locations over 2 years. Growing conditions included terminal drought, intermittent drought, low phosphorus and low nitrogen. Phenologic and agronomic data including yield were collected in all environments while a customized phenotyping cart was used in two environments to collect geo-referenced plant height and temperature data. Root architectural analysis was conducted at three locations. Samples for analysis of root hair length and density was taken from field grown samples and from laboratory grown samples. Data indicates significant genotypic variation in performance under different conditions but several lines excelled in multiple environments. Phenotyping efforts suggest canopy temperature depression and root architecture are involved in edaphic stress tolerance and pollen viability is critical for tolerance to high temperature. GWAS results indicate these traits are controlled by many loci of small effect. The collaborative based phenotyping platforms implemented by this project are likely to highlight selectable traits and genotypes in other species.

Technical Abstract: Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) productivity is constrained by abiotic soil conductions including drought and low fertility as well as by high temperature. High temperature primarily impacts pollen viability and growth. Soil water content and nutrients occur heterogeneously and often in a stratified pattern. Multiple shoot and root phenotypes can be used to differentiate and identify genotypes and resistance mechanisms that are related to increased productivity in limiting environments. Phenotpyic and/or genetic selection can then be used in a trait based selection and breeding pipeline. We conducted replicated field trials of an Andean and Meso-american common bean diversity panels in 6 locations over 2 years. Growing conditions included terminal drought, intermittent drought, low phosphorus and low nitrogen. Phenologic and agronomic data including yield were collected in all environments while a customized phenotyping cart was used in two environments to collect geo-referenced plant height and temperature data. Root architectural analysis was conducted at three locations. Samples for analysis of root hair length and density was taken from field grown samples and from laboratory grown samples. Data indicates significant genotypic variation in performance under different conditions but several lines excelled in multiple environments. Phenotyping efforts suggest canopy temperature depression and root architecture are involved in edaphic stress tolerance and pollen viability is critical for tolerance to high temperature. GWAS results indicate these traits are controlled by many loci of small effect. The collaborative based phenotyping platforms implemented by this project are likely to highlight selectable traits and genotypes in other species.