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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mayaguez, Puerto Rico » Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #326810

Research Project: Development and implementation of robust molecular markers and genetic improvement of common and tepary beans in Central America and Haiti

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Breeding Beans with Bruchid and Multiple Virus Resistance

Author
item Beaver, James
item Gonzalez, Abiezer
item Bernrdo, Mateo
item Rosas, J.c.
item Trukhina, Yulia
item Porch, Timothy - Tim

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/11/2016
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are worldwide threats to dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production. Beans planted in the lowlands of Central America and the Caribbean also need resistance to Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV). The common bean weevil (Acanthoscelides obtectus) and the Mexican bean weevil (Zabrotes subfasciatus) can cause significant losses in seed yield and quality of the bean crop. Although the use of insecticides is a common practice to control the bean weevil, this option may be unavailable or too expensive and potentially dangerous for many small-scale farmers. The development of bean lines with resistance to bean weevils would decrease the damage caused by these pests and allow small-scale farmers to store beans for consumption or sale in local markets. The principal objective of this research was to develop tropically-adapted Mesoamerican race (black, small red and white) and Andean (red mottled, sugar, yellow and white) bean lines that combine bean weevil and BGYMV, BCMV and BCMNV resistance. A secondary objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of the bruchid resistance when breeding lines are exposed on small-scale farms to different species and ecotypes of bruchids. A longer-term objective is to collaborate with North Dakota State University (NDSU) researchers to develop robust molecular markers for bruchid resistance. The bruchid resistance was derived from the cross ‘Rojo*3 / SMARC 2-PN-1 // ICA Pijao*2 / G40199’ made by Dr. Paul Kusolwa of Sokoine University of Agriculture and Dr. Jim Myers of Oregon State University. The dark red kidney breeding line AO-1012-29-3-3A was selected from this population in Puerto Rico for resistance to the bean weevil. AO-1012-29-3-3A also has the I and bc-12 genes that confer resistance to BCMV and many pathotypes of BCMNV. AO-1012-29-3-3A was used as a progenitor to develop black bean breeding lines that combine bruchid resistance with genes for resistance to BGYM, BCMV and BCMNV. Results from a trial conducted in Honduras found AO-1012-29-3-3A and the black bean breeding lines to have resistance to the Mexican bean weevil. During the upcoming year, the performance and bruchid resistance of the black bean breeding lines will be tested in Honduras, Guatemala and Haiti. A second cycle of crosses has produced breeding lines with small red, white, red mottled, yellow and sugar bean seed types that are currently being screened for resistance to bruchids and resistance to BGYM, BCMV and BCMNV. NDSU scientists have identified putative markers for the APA locus which contributes to bruchid resistance. This improved germplasm could reduce post-harvest losses in common bean due to bruchid infestation.

Technical Abstract: Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are worldwide threats to dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production. Beans planted in the lowlands of Central America and the Caribbean also need resistance to Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV). The common bean weevil (Acanthoscelides obtectus Say) and the Mexican bean weevil (Zabrotes subfasciatus Boheman) can cause significant losses in seed yield and quality of the bean crop. Although the use of insecticides is a common practice to control the bean weevil, this option may be unavailable or too expensive and potentially dangerous for many small-scale farmers.The development of bean lines with resistance to bean weevils would decrease the damage caused by these pests and allow small-scale farmers to store beans for consumption or sale in local markets. The principal objective of this research was to develop tropically-adapted Mesoamerican race (black, small red and white) and Andean (red mottled, sugar, yellow and white) bean lines that combine bean weevil and BGYMV, BCMV and BCMNV resistance. A secondary objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of the bruchid resistance when breeding lines are exposed on small-scale farms to different species and ecotypes of bruchids. A longer-term objective is to collaborate with North Dakota State University (NDSU) researchers to develop robust molecular markers for bruchid resistance. The bruchid resistance was derived from the cross ‘Rojo*3 / SMARC 2-PN-1 // ICA Pijao*2 / G40199’ made by Dr. Paul Kusolwa of Sokoine University of Agriculture and Dr. Jim Myers of Oregon State University. The dark red kidney breeding line AO-1012-29-3-3A was selected from this population in Puerto Rico for resistance to the bean weevil. AO-1012-29-3-3A also has the I and bc-12 genes that confer resistance to BCMV and many pathotypes of BCMNV. AO-1012-29-3-3A was used as a progenitor to develop black bean breeding lines that combine bruchid resistance with genes for resistance to BGYM, BCMV and BCMNV. Results from a trial conducted in Honduras found AO-1012-29-3-3A and the black bean breeding lines to have resistance to the Mexican bean weevil. During the upcoming year, the performance and bruchid resistance of the black bean breeding lines will be tested in Honduras, Guatemala and Haiti. A second cycle of crosses has produced breeding lines with small red, white, red mottled, yellow and sugar bean seed types that are currently being screened for resistance to bruchids and resistance to BGYM, BCMV and BCMNV. NDSU scientists have identified putative markers for the APA locus which contributes to bruchid resistance.