Skip to main content
ARS Home » Plains Area » Clay Center, Nebraska » U.S. Meat Animal Research Center » Genetics, Breeding, and Animal Health Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #325059

Research Project: Genetic and Biological Determinants Of Respiratory Diseases Of Ruminants

Location: Genetics, Breeding, and Animal Health Research

Title: Genome sequencing, metabolic and antibiotic resistance phenotyping of diverse nasopharyngeal bacteria isolated from cattle in an epidemiological study of bovine respiratory disease

Author
item Harhay, Gregory
item Harhay, Dayna
item Bono, James - Jim
item Smith, Timothy - Tim
item Heaton, Michael - Mike
item Clawson, Michael - Mike
item Chitko Mckown, Carol
item Capik, Sara - Kansas State University
item Dedonder, Keith - Kansas State University
item Apley, Michael - Kansas State University
item Lubbers, Brian - Kansas State University
item White, Bradley - Kansas State University
item Larson, Robert - Kansas State University

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/12/2016
Publication Date: 6/16/2016
Citation: Harhay, G.P., Harhay, D.M., Bono, J.L., Smith, T.P., Heaton, M.P., Clawson, M.L., Chitko-McKown, C.G., Capik, S.F., DeDonder, K.D., Apley, M.D., Lubbers, B.V., White, B.J., Larson, R.L. 2016. Genome sequencing, metabolic and antibiotic resistance phenotyping of diverse nasopharyngeal bacteria isolated from cattle in an epidemiological study of bovine respiratory disease [abstract]. American Society for Microbiology 2016 Meeting, July 16-20, 2016, Boston, MA. Poster No. Friday-057.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Problem: Despite over 100 years of research to reduce the incidence and impact of bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in North American feed yard cattle, outbreaks still occur accounting for up to 75% of feed yard cattle morbidity. BRDC is the primary driver of health-related antibiotic treatment, and is the most costly disease of feed yard cattle. Pathogenicity and virulence determinants of bacteria associated with BRDC remain incompletely understood and constitute a barrier to effective and precise treatment. Goal: Integrate genomic and phenotyping technologies to characterize molecular entities, pathways, and biological processes in nasopharyngeal bacteria to identify pathogenicity and virulence determinants associated with BRDC. Approach: A multi-institutional team with expertise in veterinary medicine, microbiology, genomics, and bioinformatics collaborated in a 28-day study to isolate diverse nasopharyngeal bacteria from 180 calves sampled at both sale barn and feed yard. Two thousand bacterial isolates from 28 case and 28 matched control animals were identified to species level. We have initially identified over 40 species that are not represented by closed genomes in GenBank. Closed genomes from these and other bacteria will seed downstream transcriptomic, epigenomic, and biochemical analyses to identify promoters, genes, and pathways from in vitro experiments. Antibiotic resistance and metabolic profiles are being characterized. Results: The newly closed genomes of over 10 nasopharyngeal bacterial species and their antibiotic resistance profiles will be presented and available at GenBank. Genera include Achromobacter, Comamonas, and Kurthia. We will discuss our approaches to integrate genomic information with metabolic phenotypes to identify molecular entities, pathways, and biological processes that are enriched or depleted in genes that distinguish bacteria from case and control animals.