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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Florence, South Carolina » Coastal Plain Soil, Water and Plant Conservation Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #324036

Research Project: Enhancement of Cotton Genetics and Management Systems to Improve Yield, Fiber Quality, and Production Stability

Location: Coastal Plain Soil, Water and Plant Conservation Research

Title: Genetic analysis of cottonseed protein and oil in a diverse cotton germplasm

Author
item Campbell, Benjamin - Todd
item Chapman, Kent - University Of North Texas
item Sturteveant, Drew - University Of North Texas
item Kenndey, Chris - University Of North Texas
item Horn, Patrick - Michigan State University
item Chee, Peng - University Of Georgia
item Lubbers, Ed - University Of Georgia
item Meredith Jr, William
item Johnson, Joe - Phytogen Seed Company
item Fraser, Dawn - Monsanto Corporation
item Jones, Don - Cotton, Inc.

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/10/2016
Publication Date: 6/17/2016
Citation: Campbell, B.T., Chapman, K., Sturteveant, D., Kenndey, C., Horn, P., Chee, P., Lubbers, E., Meredith Jr, W.R., Johnson, J., Fraser, D., Jones, D. 2016. Genetic analysis of cottonseed protein and oil in a diverse cotton germplasm. Crop Science. 56:1-8. doi: 10.2135/cropsci2015.12.0742.

Interpretive Summary: Historically, cotton breeding programs have focused on improving the quantity and quality of cotton fiber. Due to the added value of cottonseed and its many uses, including a feed and human food source, there is interest in developing cotton breeding programs that focus improvement efforts simultaneously on cotton fiber and seed. In this study, we conducted a genetic analysis of cottonseed protein and oil. Environment was responsible for a sizeable portion of the total variation for protein and oil, and genetics accounted for a larger portion of variation for oil than protein. Environmental sensitivity across different growing environments was greater for oil than protein. A strong, negative genetic association was found between protein and oil. Positive genetic associations were found for protein and several agronomic traits including lint yield; whereas negative genetic associations were found between oil and lint yield along with other agronomic traits. Overall, results showed very little association between protein, oil, and fiber quality traits. These findings indicate that future breeding programs could focus on simultaneously improving the value of both cotton fiber and seed.

Technical Abstract: Historically, the primary objective of cotton breeding programs was to improve the quantity and quality of cotton fiber. Due to the added value of cottonseed and its many uses, including a feed and human food source, there is interest in developing cotton breeding programs that focus improvement efforts simultaneously on cotton fiber and seed. Genetic analysis of cottonseed traits such as protein and oil is a prerequisite to building new joint fiber and seed cotton breeding programs. In this study, we conducted a genetic analysis of a diverse set of elite upland cotton germplasm for cottonseed protein and oil. Environment was responsible for a sizeable portion of the total variation for protein and oil, and genetics accounted for a larger portion of variation for oil than protein. Genotype × environment interactions significantly impacted oil but not protein. Genotypic correlation analysis found a strong, negative relationship between protein and oil. Positive genotypic correlations were found for protein and several agronomic traits including lint yield; whereas negative correlations were found between oil and lint yield along with other agronomic traits. Overall, results showed very little association between protein, oil, and fiber quality traits. These findings indicate that altering protein and/or oil seed composition will impact yield and yield component traits. However, alterations in seed composition should not impact fiber quality.