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ARS Home » Plains Area » Brookings, South Dakota » Integrated Cropping Systems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #323823

Research Project: Productive Cropping Systems Based on Ecological Principles of Pest Management

Location: Integrated Cropping Systems Research

Title: Corn insect pests

Author
item Varenhorst, Adam - South Dakota State University
item Fuller, Billy - South Dakota State University
item French, Bryan

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/14/2016
Publication Date: 9/14/2016
Citation: Adam J. Varenhorst, B. Fuller, and B.W. French. 2016. Chapter 51. Corn Insect Pests. In Clay, D.E., C.G. Carlson, S.A. Clay, and E. Byamukama (eds). iGrow Corn: Best Management Practices. South Dakota State University. Available: http://igrow.org/agronomy/corn/igrow-corn-best-management-practices.

Interpretive Summary: In South Dakota the primary pests of corn have been the larvae of corn rootworms (northern and western), European corn borer, and black cutworm. Corn hybrids producing Bt-toxins are effective against most of these pests. But, other minor or sporadic pests of corn in South Dakota including the bird cherry oat aphid, corn leaf aphid, corn rootworm adults, fall armyworm, true armyworm, and the common stalk borer can also damage corn and, under the suitable conditions they are capable of reducing corn yields. This chapter provides information on the biology and management of major and minor corn insect pests commonly observed in South Dakota.

Technical Abstract: Historically, the major corn insect pests in South Dakota have been the larvae of corn rootworms (northern and western), European corn borer, and black cutworm. Bt-corn hybrids are effective against most of these pests. However, there are also minor or sporadic pests of corn in South Dakota including the bird cherry oat aphid, corn leaf aphid, corn rootworm adults, fall armyworm, true armyworm, and the common stalk borer. Although these pests are considered minor, under the appropriate conditions they are capable of reducing corn yields. This chapter discusses the biology and management of important corn insect pests commonly observed in South Dakota.