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ARS Home » Plains Area » Grand Forks, North Dakota » Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center » Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #323721

Research Project: Food Factors to Prevent Obesity and Related Diseases

Location: Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research

Title: Resistant starch analysis of commonly consumed potatoes: Content varies by cooking method and service temperature but not by variety

Author
item Raatz, Susan
item Idso, Laura
item Johnson, Luann - University Of North Dakota
item Jackson, Matthew - Hill's Pet Nutrition
item Combs, Jr, Gerald - Retired Ars Employee

Submitted to: Food Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/30/2016
Publication Date: 4/1/2016
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/62395
Citation: Raatz, S.K., Idso, L.A., Johnson, L.K., Jackson, M.I., Combs, Jr, G.F. 2016. Resistant starch analysis of commonly consumed potatoes: Content varies by cooking method and service temperature but not by variety. [epub ahead of print] http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814616305052.

Interpretive Summary: Resistant starch found in potatoes may provide health benefits. We studied the resistant starch content of potatoes by variety, cooking method and service temperature. Results showed that the resistant starch content of potatoes varied by preparation method and service temperature but not variety. Baked potatoes had higher resistant starch contents than boiled; chilled potatoes had more resistant starch than either hot or reheated.

Technical Abstract: Resistant starch (RS) has properties which may provide health benefits. We conducted a study to determine the contributions of cultivar, cooking method and service temperature on the RS contents of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.). We hypothesized that the RS content would vary by variety, cooking method and service temperature. Potatoes of three common commercial varieties (Yukon Gold, Red Norland, and Russet Burbank) were subjected to two methods of cooking (baking or boiling) and three service temperatures: hot (65°C), chilled (4°C) and reheated (4°C for 6d and reheated to 65°C) and analyzed the starch content by modification of a commercially available assay. Results showed that RS content (g/100g) varied by preparation method and service temperature but not variety. Baked potatoes had higher RS contents than boiled; chilled potatoes had more RS than either hot or reheated. These results may assist in dietary choices for reducing chronic disease risk.