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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Northwest Sustainable Agroecosystems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #321758

Research Project: Mitigating Agricultural Sources of Particulate Matter and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Pacific Northwest

Location: Northwest Sustainable Agroecosystems Research

Title: Windrow burning eliminates Italian Ryegrass (Lolium perenne ssp. multiflorum) seed viability

Author
item LYON, DREW - Washington State University
item Huggins, David
item SPRING, JOHN - Washington State University

Submitted to: Weed Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/8/2015
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Burning of crop residues remaining after harvest with a combine is one weed seed control strategy that have been developed and evaluated in Australia to address the evolution of herbicide resistance in annual weeds. Herbicide-resistant Italian ryegrass populations are common in the Palouse region of eastern Washington and northern Idaho. Field and greenhouse studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of burning standing stubble and residue in windrows on the survival of Italian ryegrass seed and to determine the amount of crop residue remaining after burning. Italian ryegrass emergence was highest for the non-burned check and lowest for the burned windrow. Crop residue remaining after burning was the same for standing stubble and windrows. We concluded that windrow burning can be an effective tactic in an integrated weed management strategy for Italian ryegrass control in eastern Washington and northern Idaho. These results will be useful for producers, NRCS, agribusiness and scientists interested in integrated weed management strategies particularly with herbicide resistant weeds.

Technical Abstract: Burning of crop residues that have been concentrated behind the harvest combine (windrowed) is one of several harvest weed seed control strategies that have been developed and evaluated in Australia to address the widespread evolution of multiple herbicide resistance in annual weeds. Herbicide-resistant Italian ryegrass populations are common in the Palouse region of eastern Washington and northern Idaho. Field and greenhouse studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of burning standing stubble and narrow windrows on the survival of Italian ryegrass seed on the soil surface and to determine the amount of crop residue remaining after both practices. Italian ryegrass emergence was 63, 48, and 1% for the non-burned check, burned standing stubble, and burned windrow treatments, respectively. Crop residue dry weights were 9.94, 5.69, and 5.79 Mg ha-1 for these same treatments. We concluded that windrow burning can be an effective tactic in an integrated weed management strategy for Italian ryegrass control in the Palouse region of eastern Washington and northern Idaho.