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ARS Home » Plains Area » Grand Forks, North Dakota » Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center » Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #319721

Research Project: Health Roles of Dietary Selenium in Obesity

Location: Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research

Title: Effect of irrigation, intercrop and cultivar on agronomic and nutritional characteristics of quinoa

Author
item Walters, Hannah - Washington State University
item Carpenter-boggs, Lynne - Washington State University
item Desta, Kefaylew - Montana State University
item Yan, Lin
item Matanguihan, Janet - Washington State University
item Murphy, Kevin - Washington State University

Submitted to: Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 4/10/2016
Publication Date: 8/11/2016
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/5451330
Citation: Walters, H., Carpenter-Boggs, L., Desta, K., Yan, L., Matanguihan, J., Murphy, K. 2016. Effect of irrigation, intercrop and cultivar on agronomic and nutritional characteristics of quinoa. Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems. 40(8):783-803.

Interpretive Summary: Quinoa is becoming a popular food due to its high nutrition, complete protein, and being gluten free. Its production has gained interest worldwide due to market demand and current limited production. However, in many parts of the world, there is a lack of information regarding quinoa establishment, production and management. Thus, it is crucial to evaluate varieties and management practices in new environments that have potential for growing quinoa. The present study investigated effects of different irrigation regimes and intercrop treatments on yield and seed quality of two quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) varieties on an organic system in Pullman, Washington State. Results of the study showed that irrigation helped to decrease heat stress in quinoa and allowed higher yields compared with dryland quinoa production in areas with high heat during critical growth stages. Deficit irrigation would be recommended in areas with limited water resources. Intercrop treatments provided cover in the field during the winter months thus decreasing soil erosion and providing green manure the following season. Furthermore, intercrop treatments increased quinoa seed protein without affecting quinoa yield.

Technical Abstract: A field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of three irrigation regimes and three intercrop treatments on emergence, plant height, seed yield, protein and mineral concentration of two quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) varieties. The experiment was carried out using a strip plot, randomized complete block design in 2012 and 2013 on an organic farm in Pullman, WA. Irrigation significantly increased quinoa yield compared to dry land production. The fescue/clover intercrop produced higher biomass compared to clover/medic intercrop. Neither intercrop affected quinoa yield. The cultivar ‘Oro de Valle’ had higher mineral concentration than ‘Cherry Vanilla’ for Cu, Fe and P concentration, but lower seed yield each year. An interaction was found between Mn seed concentration and intercrop treatment; however, different intercrop treatments did not seem to greatly affect other seed mineral concentrations. The intercrop provided cover in the field during the winter months thus decreasing soil erosion and providing green manure the following season. The fescue grass clover mix created more winter cover compared to the clover/medic intercrop whereas the clover and medic mixture increased quinoa seed protein.