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Research Project: Pediatric Clinical Nutrition

Location: Children's Nutrition Research Center

Title: Incorporating primary and secondary prevention approaches to address childhood obesity prevention and treatment in a low-income, ethnically diverse population

Author
item Hoelscher, Deanna - University Of Texas
item Butte, Nancy - Children'S Nutrition Research Center (CNRC)
item Barlow, Sarah - Texas Children'S Hospital
item Vandewater, Elizabeth - University Of Texas
item Sharma, Shrella - University Of Texas
item Huang, Terry - Nebraska Medical Center
item Finkelstein, Eric - Duke University
item Pont, Stephen - University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
item Sacher, Paul - University College London
item Byrd-williams, Courtney - University Of Texas
item Oluyomi, Abiodun - University Of Texas
item Durand, Casey - Texas Children'S Hospital
item Li, Linlin - University Of Texas
item Kelder, Steven - University Of Texas

Submitted to: Childhood Obesity
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/1/2014
Publication Date: 2/1/2015
Citation: Hoelscher, D.M., Butte, N.F., Barlow, S., Vandewater, E.A., Sharma, S.V., Huang, T., Finkelstein, E., Pont, S., Sacher, P., Byrd-Williams, C., Oluyomi, A.O., Durand, C., Li, L., Kelder, S.H. 2015. Incorporating primary and secondary prevention approaches to address childhood obesity prevention and treatment in a low-income, ethnically diverse population. Childhood Obesity. 11(1):71-91.

Interpretive Summary: This publication describes the study design and baseline data from the Texas Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (TX CORD) project in which a systems-oriented approach was taken for childhood obesity prevention and treatment. TX CORD addresses child obesity among low-income, ethnically diverse overweight and obese children, and ages 2–12 years. Primary and secondary interventions were designed and implemented in a predominately Hispanic/Latino population in Austin and Houston where childhood obesity rates exceed national values, ranging from 19.0% in preschool to 35.2% in fifth-grade children. Integrating primary and secondary approaches is anticipated to lead to significant decreases in childhood obesity.

Technical Abstract: There is consensus that development and evaluation of a systems-oriented approach for child obesity prevention and treatment that includes both primary and secondary prevention efforts is needed. This article describes the study design and baseline data from the Texas Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (TX CORD) project, which addresses child obesity among low-income, ethnically diverse overweight and obese children, ages 2–12 years; a two-tiered systems-oriented approach is hypothesized to reduce BMI z-scores, compared to primary prevention alone. Our study aims are to: (1) implement and evaluate a primary obesity prevention program; (2) implement and evaluate efficacy of a 12-month family-centered secondary obesity prevention program embedded within primary prevention; and (3) quantify the incremental cost-effectiveness of the secondary prevention program. Baseline demographic and behavioral data for the primary prevention community areas are presented. Baseline data from preschool centers, elementary schools, and clinics indicate that most demographic variables are similar between intervention and comparison communities. Most families are low income (£ $25,000) and Hispanic/Latino (73.3–83.8%). The majority of parents were born outside of the United States. Child obesity rates exceed national values, ranging from 19.0% in preschool to 35.2% in fifth-grade children. Most parents report that their children consume sugary beverages, have a television in the bedroom, and do not consume adequate amounts of fruits and vegetables. Interventions to address childhood obesity are warranted in low-income, ethnically diverse communities. Integrating primary and secondary approaches is anticipated to provide sufficient exposure that will lead to significant decreases in childhood obesity.