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Research Project: Management of Crop Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: Plant Introduction Research

Title: Maize Genetic Resources Collections – Utilizing a Treasure Trove

Author
item Gardner, Candice
item Millard, Mark

Submitted to: Agronomy Society of America, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/5/2015
Publication Date: 11/13/2015
Citation: Gardner, C.A., Millard, M.J. 2015. Maize Genetic Resources Collections – Utilizing a Treasure Trove [abstract]. Agronomy Society of America, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America Meeting. Abstract no. 244-4.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The maize genetic resource collection managed by the USDA-ARS's National Plant Germplasm System is heavily utilized by researchers and educators. A collection of landraces, inbred lines from public and private sector sources, synthetics and key populations, it serves both as a living snapshot of the history of corn breeding and as a well of genetic diversity from which future crop improvement solutions can be drawn. Nearly 21,000 accessions are maintained in Ames, IA at the North Central Regional Plant Introduction Station. Approximately 100,000 other unique accessions are maintained in Urbana, IL as part of the Maize Genetics Cooperation Stock Center. The latter collection is devoted to classical mutant lines, specific chromosome marker lines, lines with well characterized genes, and the products of modern genetic investigations. Comprehensive international collections, such as CIMMYT's, offer additional and unique genetic resources. In order to understand and exploit the value of the germplasm, phenotypic and genetic characterization information must be integrated, and significant progress has been made in some respects. We will describe how the Ames collection has being utilized in recent years, some important findings that have resulted from its utilization, and discuss the information needed to leverage future discovery potential.