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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Miami, Florida » Subtropical Horticulture Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #316065

Research Project: Genetic Characterization, Genetic Improvement, and Best Horticultural Management Practices for Subtropical/Tropical Ornamental Germplasm

Location: Subtropical Horticulture Research

Title: Genetic diversity and differentiation of Pseudophoenix (Arecaceae) in Hispaniola

Author
item Rodriguez-pena, Rosa - Florida International University
item Jestrow, Brett - Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden
item Meerow, Alan
item Chase, Teodoro - Jardín Botánico Nacional
item Jimenez-rodriguez, Fransisco - Jardín Botánico Nacional
item Griffith, Patrick - Montgomery Botanical Center
item Santiago-valentin, Fransisco - University Of Puerto Rico
item Sustache-sustache, Jose - Department Of Natural Resources
item Fransisco-ortega, Javier - Florida International University

Submitted to: Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 12/1/2014
Publication Date: 2/6/2015
Citation: Rodriguez-Pena, R., Jestrow, B., Meerow, A.W., Chase, T., Jimenez-Rodriguez, F., Griffith, P., Santiago-Valentin, F., Sustache-Sustache, J., Fransisco-Ortega, J. 2015. Genetic diversity and differentiation of Pseudophoenix (Arecaceae) in Hispaniola. Review Article. 176:469-485.

Interpretive Summary: Interpretive Abstract Pseudophoenix ekmanii Burret, P. lediniana Read, and P. vinifera (Mart.) Becc. (Arecaceae) are found only on Hispaniola. The more wide-ranging P. sargentii H.Wendl. ex Sarg. occurs on this island as well. The population genetic diversity and structure of Pseudophoenix was investigated using ten microsatellite DNA markers. The study focused on populations from Hispaniola but also included samples from other Caribbean islands. Results showed a great deal of inbreeding in all populations. Populations were highly differentiated. Results from genetic analyses identified groups that were consistent with currently accepted species delimitations. We included the only known population of a possibly undescribed taxon from the Dominican Republic. Results from the analyses suggested that this taxon is closely related to P. sargentii from the Turks and Caicos islands. Contrary to what was anticipated, protected areas do not harbor most of the genetic diversity of the genus. The Haitian endemic P. lediniana should have the highest priority for conservation because it is restricted to one population, it has a small number of individuals, and it exhibited reduced levels of genetic diversity. The putative new taxon from the Dominican Republic has similar conservation concerns. Future conservation efforts should aim to maintain population connectivity and increase population size, particularly targeting populations with low genetic diversity.

Technical Abstract: Technical Abstract Pseudophoenix ekmanii Burret, P. lediniana Read, and P. vinifera (Mart.) Becc. (Arecaceae) are endemic to Hispaniola. The more wide-ranging P. sargentii H.Wendl. ex Sarg. occurs on this island as well. The population genetic diversity and structure of Pseudophoenix was investigated using ten microsatellite loci. The study focused on populations from Hispaniola but also included samples from other Caribbean islands. Results showed homozygote excess and high inbreeding coefficients in all populations across all polymorphic loci. Populations were highly differentiated. Results from both Bayesian and Neighbor Joining cluster analyses identified groups that were consistent with currently accepted species delimitations. We included the only known population of a possibly undescribed taxon from the Dominican Republic. Results from the cluster analyses suggested that this putative taxon is closely related to P. sargentii from the Turks and Caicos islands. There was no a significant correlation between population size and observed heterozygosity. Contrary to what was anticipated, protected areas do not harbor most of the genetic diversity of the genus. The Haitian endemic P. lediniana should have the highest priority for conservation because it is restricted to one population, it has a small number of individuals, and it exhibited reduced levels of genetic diversity. The putative new taxon from the Dominican Republic has similar conservation concerns. Future conservation efforts should aim to maintain population connectivity and increase population size, particularly targeting populations with low genetic diversity.