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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Athens, Georgia » U.S. National Poultry Research Center » Bacterial Epidemiology & Antimicrobial Resistance Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #314627

Research Project: Microbial Ecology of Human Pathogens Relative to Poultry Processing

Location: Bacterial Epidemiology & Antimicrobial Resistance Research

Title: Comparison of selective media for detection and enumeration of naturally occurring Campylobacter spp. on poultry

Author
item STEININGER, C - University Of Georgia
item HARRISON, M - University Of Georgia
item Berrang, Mark

Submitted to: Meeting, Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/26/2015
Publication Date: 3/3/2015
Citation: Steininger, C.G., Harrison, M.A., Berrang, M.E. 2015. Comparison of selective media for detection and enumeration of naturally occurring Campylobacter spp. on poultry. Meeting, Center for Food Safety, University of Georgia. March 3, 2015. Athens, Georgia.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Introduction: Campylobacter spp. are known to be among the most common bacteria to cause diarrheal illness, with poultry being linked as the primary source of contamination related to foodborne illness. Enumeration and detection of low numbers of naturally occurring Campylobacter spp. on poultry products has proven to be very difficult due to the presence of competing microflora that is not eliminated by selective media and broths. Purpose: This study compared the most effectiveness of various combinations of enrichment broths and plating media for the detection of naturally occurring Campylobacter spp. in broiler carcass rinses. Specifically, the use of Campylobacter RF Chromogenic agar (RFA) and the addition of triclosan to Bolton enrichment broth were evaluated based on their ability to eliminate background microflora originating from broiler carcass rinses. Methods: Campy-Cefex Agar (CCA) and Campylobacter RF Chromogenic agar (RFA) were used for enumeration of Campylobacter spp. recovered from 100 mL Buffered Peptone Water (BPW) carcass rinses. These two selective media types were also used in coordination with Bolton broth and Bolton broth supplemented with 1 µg/mL Triclosan (T-Bolton) to enrich for positive or negative. Results: On average, Campylobacter enumeration from carcass rinses on RFA resulted in a 3.38 log CFU/mL recovery of Campylobacter spp. with little contamination by background microflora, while enumeration on CCA resulted in a 3.17 log CFU/mL recovery of Campylobacter spp. with a significant amount of contamination by background microflora. No significant difference (p>0.05) was observed between enumeration of Campylobacter spp. on RFA compared to CCA. Enrichment using Bolton and CCA resulted in 39.2% positive samples out of 24 total rinse samples, enrichment using T-Bolton and CCA resulted in 50.0% positive samples, enrichment using Bolton and RFA resulted in 65.8% positive samples, and enrichment using T-Bolton and RFA resulted in 69.2% positive samples. Significance: When enumerating or enriching for naturally occurring Campylobacter spp. in carcass rinses, Campylobacter RF Chromogenic agar (RFA) and Bolton broth supplemented with triclosan (T-Bolton) proved to be most effective in the elimination of background microflora, therefore allowing for more accurate enumeration and enrichment procedures. Because there was no significant difference seen for enumeration when comparing the CCA and RFA, it is suggested that they be used in unison to ensure optimal recovery of Campylobacter spp. for direct plate procedures.