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ARS Home » Northeast Area » Kearneysville, West Virginia » Appalachian Fruit Research Laboratory » Innovative Fruit Production, Improvement, and Protection » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #313381

Research Project: Integrated Orchard Management and Automation for Deciduous Tree Fruit Crops

Location: Innovative Fruit Production, Improvement, and Protection

Title: Attraction of the invasive Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) to traps baited with semiochemical stimuli across the United States

Author
item Leskey, Tracy
item AGNELLO, ARTHUR - Cornell University - New York
item BERGH, CHRISTOPHER - Virginia Tech
item DIVELY, GALEN - University Of Maryland
item HAMILTON, GEORGE - Rutgers University
item JENTSCH, PETER - Cornell University - New York
item Khrimian, Ashot
item KRAWCZYK, GREGORZ - Pennsylvania State University
item KUHAR, TOM - Virginia Tech
item LEE, DOO-HYUNG - Gachon University
item Morrison Iii, William - Rob
item POLK, DEAN - Rutgers University
item RODRIGUEZ-SAONA, CESAR - Virginia Tech
item SHEARER, PETER - Oregon State University
item Short, Brent
item SHREWSBURY, PAULA M - University Of Maryland
item WALGENBACH, JAMES - North Carolina State University
item WELTY, CELESTE - The Ohio State University
item WHALEN, JOANNE - University Of Delaware
item Weber, Donald
item WIMAN, NIK - Oregon State University

Submitted to: Environmental Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 3/23/2015
Publication Date: 4/24/2015
Citation: Leskey, T.C., Agnello, A., Bergh, C., Dively, G.P., Hamilton, G.C., Jentsch, P., Khrimian, A., Krawczyk, G., Kuhar, T.P., Lee, D., Morrison III, W.R., Polk, D.F., Rodriguez-Saona, C., Shearer, P.W., Short, B.D., Shrewsbury, P., Walgenbach, J.F., Welty, C., Whalen, J., Weber, D.C., Wiman, N. 2015. Attraction of the invasive Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) to traps baited with semiochemical stimuli across the United States. Environmental Entomology. DOI: 10.1093/ee/nvv049.

Interpretive Summary: The recent identification of the aggregation pheromone for the brown marmorated stink bug, an invasive and destructive pest in the United States, has allowed researchers to more accurately assess the abundance and seasonal activity of the insect. In this study, the attraction of the brown marmorated stink bug to black pyramid traps baited with the aggregation pheromone alone, a synergist alone, or both together was assessed. Traps were deployed in a variety of crop and non-crop habitats in DE, MD, NC, NJ, NY, PA, OH, OR, VA, and WV from mid-April to mid-October 2012 and 2013. Researchers confirmed that brown marmorated stink bug adults and nymphs are attracted to the aggregation pheromone season-long, but attraction is increased with the addition of the synergist. The peak in overwintering adult abundance in traps occurred in middle to late May, while the largest overall abundance of adults in traps occurred early September. The greatest number of stink bugs were found in the Eastern inland regions, followed by the Eastern coastal plain sites. The fewest were found in the Pacific Northwest. However, regardless of location in the United States, all mobile life stages of the brown marmorated stink bug were reliably attracted to traps baited with a combination of the aggregation pheromone and synergist, suggesting these lures may be used by growers to reliably detect and monitor pest populations in the field.

Technical Abstract: With the recent identification of the two-component aggregation pheromone of the invasive stink bug species, Halyomorpha halys Stål, and with the aid of a lure with a 3.5:1 mixture of (3S,6S,7R,10S)-10,11-epoxy-1-bisabolen-3-ol and (3R,6S,7R,10S)-10,11-epoxy-1-bisabolen-3-ol, the ability to accurately monitor the presence, abundance and seasonal activity of this destructive pest was greatly improved. Here, we evaluated the attraction of H. halys to black pyramid traps baited with lures containing the pheromone alone, the synergist and kairomone methyl decatrieonate alone, and in combination. Traps were deployed between areas of agricultural production including fruit orchards, vegetables, ornamentals and row crops and wild host habitat. Trials were conducted in DE, MD, NC, NJ, NY, PA, OH, OR, VA and WV from mid-April to mid-October in 2012 and 2013. We confirmed that H. halys adults and nymphs are attracted to the aggregation pheromone season-long, but that attraction is significantly increased with the addition of methyl decatrieonate. H. halys adults were detected in traps in April with peaks in overwintering adults detected in mid- to late May. The largest adult populations were present in the late-season, typically in early September. Nymphal captures began in late May and continued season-long. Overall captures declined rapidly and ceased almost entirely by mid-October. Captures were greatest in sites located in the Eastern inland regions, followed by Eastern coastal plain sites and the Pacific Northwest. Importantly, regardless of site location in the United States, all life stages of H. halys reliably respond to the combination of H. halys aggregation pheromone and the synergist throughout the entire season, suggesting that growers will be able to use these stimuli for the purposes of monitoring to make management decisions.