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ARS Home » Midwest Area » St. Paul, Minnesota » Cereal Disease Lab » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #312825

Research Project: CEREAL RUST FUNGI: GENETICS, POPULATION BIOLOGY, AND HOST-PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS

Location: Cereal Disease Lab

Title: Specificity of a rust resistance suppressor on 7DL in the spring wheat cultivar Canthatch

Author
item TALAJOOR, MINA - Montana State University
item Jin, Yue
item WAN, ANMIN - Washington State University
item Chen, Xianming
item BHAVANI, SRIDHAR - International Maize & Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT)
item TABE, LINDA - Commonwealth Scientific And Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
item LAGUDAH, EVANS - Commonwealth Scientific And Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)
item HUANG, LI - Montana State University

Submitted to: Phytopathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/30/2014
Publication Date: 4/1/2015
Publication URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25870922
Citation: Talajoor, M., Jin, Y., Wan, A., Chen, X., Bhavani, S., Tabe, L., Lagudah, E., Huang, L. 2015. Specificity of a rust resistance suppressor on 7DL in the spring wheat cultivar Canthatch. Phytopathology. 105(4):477-481.

Interpretive Summary: Wheat is one of the most consumed cereals in the world. Since its domestication, wheat has been subjected to breeding and selection in an effort to enhance or incorporate beneficial traits, including disease resistance. The spring wheat cultivar Canthatch has been shown to suppress stem rust resistance genes in the background due to the presence of a suppressor gene located on the long arm of chromosome 7D. It is however unclear whether this gene also suppresses resistance genes against leaf rust and stripe rust. In this study, we investigated the specificity of the resistance suppression by introducing into the Canthatch background 11 rust resistance genes that confer resistance to leaf, stripe or stem rusts, originating from A, B, or D genomes and located on different homoeologous groups. F1 plants of each cross were tested with corresponding rust race, and the infection types were scored and compared with the parents. Our results show that the Canthatch 7DL suppressor only suppressed stem rust resistance genes located on either A or B genome, and the pattern of the suppression is gene-specific and independent of chromosomal location. This study added new knowledge to the inter-genome interactions of wheat and will benefit wheat geneticists and breeders in wheat improvement for rust resistance.

Technical Abstract: The spring wheat cultivar Canthatch has been shown to suppress stem rust resistance genes in the background due to the presence of a suppressor gene located on the long arm of chromosome 7D. It is however unclear whether the suppressor also suppresses resistance genes against leaf rust and stripe rust. In this study, we investigated the specificity of the resistance suppression. To determine whether the suppression is genome origin-specific, chromosome location-specific or rust species- or race-specific, we introduced into the Canthatch background 11 rust resistance genes that confer resistance to leaf, stripe or stem rusts, originating from A, B, or D genomes and located on different chromosome homoeologous groups. F1 plants of each cross were tested with corresponding rust race, and the infection types were scored and compared with the parents. Our results show that the Canthatch 7DL suppressor only suppressed stem rust resistance genes located on either A or B genome, and the pattern of the suppression is gene-specific and independent of chromosomal location.