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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Griffin, Georgia » Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #312409

Research Project: Conservation, Characterization, and Evaluation of Plant Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit

Title: Seed protein percentage and mineral concentration variability and correlation with other seed quality traits in the U.S. Peanut mini-core collection

Author
item Wang, Ming
item Grusak, Michael
item Chen, Charles - Auburn University
item Tonnis, Brandon
item Barkley, Noelle
item Evans, Stacie - University Of Georgia
item Pinnow, David
item Davis, Jerry - University Of Georgia
item Phillips, Dick - University Of Georgia
item Holbrook, Carl - Corley
item Pederson, Gary

Submitted to: Peanut Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 2/16/2016
Publication Date: 11/26/2016
Publication URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/5678123
Citation: Wang, M.L., Grusak, M.A., Chen, C.Y., Tonnis, B.D., Barkley, N.L., Evans, S., Pinnow, D.L., Davis, J., Phillips, D., Holbrook Jr, C.C., Pederson, G.A. 2016. Seed protein percentage and mineral concentration variability and correlation with other seed quality traits in the U.S. Peanut mini-core collection. Peanut Science. 43:119-125.

Interpretive Summary: Protein percentage and mineral concentrations are very important for evaluation of seed quality. They were determined for 95 accessions of the U. S. peanut mini-core collection by nitrogen analysis and inductively coupled plasma – optical emission spectrometry, respectively, using material collected over two field seasons. Significant variability in the seed protein percentage among accessions was revealed, ranging from 20.6 to 30.4%, with an average of 26.2%. Significantly higher variability in plant micronutrient mineral concentrations (more than two-fold for B, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, and Zn) than in macronutrient mineral concentrations (less than two-fold for K, Mg, P, and S) was also identified among accessions. Calcium however was an exception, demonstrating 3.7-fold variability among the accessions evaluated. Three accessions (PI 497517, PI 493547, and PI 429429) were identified as lines containing high seed levels of both Fe and Zn. Correlation coefficients were also determined among 28 investigated seed chemical composition traits, using data from a previous study with the same samples. Protein percentage was significantly negatively correlated with seed weight, oil, and oleate percentage. Several mineral elements (Fe, Mg, Mn, and Zn) were also significantly negatively correlated with oleate percentage. The results from this study will be useful for peanut nutrition breeding and food product development.

Technical Abstract: Protein percentage and mineral concentrations were determined for 95 accessions of the U. S. peanut mini-core collection by nitrogen analysis and inductively coupled plasma – optical emission spectrometry, respectively, using material collected over two field seasons. Significant variability in the seed protein percentage among accessions was revealed, ranging from 20.6 to 30.4%, with an average of 26.2%. Significantly higher variability in plant micronutrient mineral concentrations (more than two-fold for B, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, and Zn) than in macronutrient mineral concentrations (less than two-fold for K, Mg, P, and S) was also identified among accessions. Calcium however was an exception, demonstrating 3.7-fold variability among the accessions evaluated. Three accessions (PI 497517, PI 493547, and PI 429429) were identified as lines containing high seed levels of both Fe and Zn. Correlation coefficients were also determined among 28 investigated seed chemical composition traits, using data from a previous study with the same samples. Protein percentage was significantly negatively correlated with seed weight, oil, and oleate percentage. Several mineral elements (Fe, Mg, Mn, and Zn) were also significantly negatively correlated with oleate percentage. The results from this study will be useful for peanut nutrition breeding and food product development.