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ARS Home » Plains Area » Grand Forks, North Dakota » Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center » Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #311847

Research Project: Food Factors to Prevent Obesity and Related Diseases

Location: Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research

Title: Glycemic effect of nutritive sweeteners: Honey, sugar and high fructose corn syrup

Author
item Raatz, Susan
item Beals, Kathie - University Of Minnesota
item Johnson, Luann - University Of North Dakota
item Picklo, Matthew

Submitted to: Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/15/2015
Publication Date: 3/28/2015
Citation: Raatz, S.K., Beals, K., Johnson, L.K., Picklo, M.J. 2015. Glycemic effect of nutritive sweeteners: Honey, sugar and high fructose corn syrup [abstract]. Journal of Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. 29:596.3.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Controversy currently exists over whether all nutritive sweeteners produce similar metabolic effects. Using a randomized, crossover design we evaluated the effects of chronic consumption of 3 nutritive sweeteners (honey, sucrose and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS)) on glucose tolerance in overweight and obese (ow/ob) adults with normal (NGT n=28) and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT n=28). Subjects consumed 50 g of their assigned sweetener for 2 wk and were counseled to maintain their usual diet and avoid caloric sweeteners other than the one they were assigned. A 1-2wk washout was completed between treatments. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was completed and homeostatic model assessment (HOMA) of insulin resistance scores were calculated at baseline and after each 2wk period. The incremental area under the curve (iAUC48) for OGTT outcomes was determined for glucose and insulin. Outcome data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA. There were no differences between fasting values, HOMA score, or iAUC for glucose or insulin at baseline or post-treatment; however, in all instances responses were higher in IGT individuals. Daily intake of 50g of honey, sugar and HFCS exerted similar effects on fasting glucose, insulin, and HOMA scores in ow/ob adults with NGT or IGT. The study was supported by the National Honey Board and USDA 5450-51000-048-00D.