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ARS Home » Plains Area » Grand Forks, North Dakota » Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center » Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #311550

Research Project: Health Roles of Dietary Selenium in Obesity

Location: Dietary Prevention of Obesity-related Disease Research

Title: Adipokine production in mice fed high-fat diets containing different types of dietary fats

Author
item Yan, Lin
item Wen-rong, Lie - Emd Millipore

Submitted to: Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/15/2015
Publication Date: 3/28/2015
Citation: Yan, L., Wen-Rong 2015. Adipokine production in mice fed high-fat diets containing different types of dietary fats [abstract]. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Conference. 29:598.2.

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: The present study compared high-fat diets containing different types of dietary fats with various levels of linoleic acid (18:2n6, LA) and a-linolenic acid (18:3n3, ALA) on adipokine production in male C57BL/6 mice. Three-week old mice were fed AIN93G diet (15% of energy from corn oil, control) or a high-fat diet with 45% of energy from corn oil (ALA deficient, high LA), soybean oil (ALA adequate, high LA), high-oleic sunflower oil (ALA adequate, low LA), flaxseed oil (ALA adequate, LA adequate) or fish oil (high ALA, eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3, EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA), low LA) for 11 weeks. High-fat diets, regardless of types of oils, increased body weight (P < 0.05) and body fat mass (P < 0.05) compared to the AIN93G-fed controls; there were no significant differences in body weight and body fat among the high-fat fed groups. High-fat fed mice consumed less food than the controls (P < 0.05), however, there was no significant difference in caloric intake among all of the groups. High-fat diets, with the exception of the fish oil diet, elevated plasma levels of insulin compared to the controls (P < 0.05) with no difference in plasma insulin between the control and the fish oil groups. Plasma concentrations of adiponectin were significantly elevated in the fish oil-fed group compared to the control group (P < 0.05) or each of the other high-fat fed groups (P < 0.05). We conclude that consumption of fish oil may affect adipokine profile in mice in a favorable manner compared to other types of dietary fats.