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ARS Home » Southeast Area » Florence, South Carolina » Coastal Plain Soil, Water and Plant Conservation Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #309713

Research Project: MANAGING WATER AVAILABILITY AND QUALITY TO MAINTAIN OR INCREASE AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION, CONSERVE NATURAL RESOURCES, AND ENHANCE ENVIRONMENT

Location: Coastal Plain Soil, Water and Plant Conservation Research

Title: Soils under conservation agriculture with vegetables in Siem Reap, Cambodia

Author
item Edralin, Don Immanuel - North Carolina Agricultural And Technical State University
item Sigua, Gilbert
item Reyes, Manuel - North Carolina Agricultural And Technical State University

Submitted to: ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/30/2014
Publication Date: N/A
Citation: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Technical Abstract: Smallholder vegetable farmers in Siem Reap, Cambodia experienced declining crop productivity. It could be a result of a mixture of factors such as nutrient and pest problems and extreme weather events such as droughts and/or heavy rains. The no-till, continuous mulch and diverse species principles of conservation agriculture (CA) could potentially increase vegetable yield by providing favorable microclimate and soil conditions for crop growth and development. Conservation agriculture was tested by fifteen women farmers in Cambodia in comparison to conventional tillage. Areas planted to vegetables in this region are built up places to avoid water logging during rainy seasons. Soil properties on site were found to be very acidic (pH=4.5) with low electrical conductivity (EC=0.03) with soil texture ranges from loamy sand to sandy clay loam. The acidity of the soil is a challenge to crop productivity as they do not apply lime. The application of lime on the farmer’s field could improve the yield of vegetables. Higher soil moisture retention respiration rates were observed under CA than the conventional tillage. Conservation agriculture retained more soil water for use by plants and reduced soil temperature. However, even with higher soil moisture retention, farmers still applies the same amount of water to CA plots than tilled. Farmers may start reducing their watering activity since CA can increase soil moisture retention. Conservation agriculture could be a promising technology in improving water use efficiency for smallholder famers. Yield of vegetables after two cropping seasons as affected by CA will be reported.