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Research Project: Management of Temperate-Adapted Fruit, Nut, and Specialty Crop Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: National Clonal Germplasm Repository

Title: Toward understanding genotype x environment interactions in black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.)

Author
item Bushakra, Jill
item Bradish, Christine - North Carolina State University
item Weber, Courtney - Cornell University - New York
item Dossett, Michael - Agriculture And Agri-Food Canada
item Fernandez, Gina - North Carolina State University
item Weiland, Jerry
item Peterson, Mary
item Scheerens, Joseph - The Ohio State University
item Robbins, Lisa - The Ohio State University
item Serce, Sedat - Nigde University
item Finn, Chad
item Bassil, Nahla

Submitted to: Acta Horticulturae
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/1/2015
Publication Date: 5/25/2016
Citation: Bushakra, J., Bradish, C., Weber, C.A., Dossett, M., Fernandez, G., Weiland, G.E., Peterson, M.E., Scheerens, J.C., Robbins, L., Serce, S., Finn, C.E., Bassil, N.V. 2016. Toward understanding genotype x environment interactions in black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.). Acta Horticulturae. 1117:25-30. doi: 10.17660/ActaHortic.2016.1117.5.

Interpretive Summary: Over the last 75 years, the black raspberry industry in the United States has undergone a slow but steady contraction because of a lack of adapted, disease resistant cultivars. Recent research about the health benefits of a diet rich in plant-derived nutrients, and black raspberries in particular, has led to a resurgence of interest in this fruit and a renewal of breeding efforts. This study seeks to advance and streamline identification of a variety of traits of interest to growers and consumers in black raspberry germplasm through assessing physical traits and the demands of the consumer. The information will be integrated into breeding programs with the goal of developing disease resistant cultivars that satisfy the demands of the marketplace, adding to the sustainability and profitability of the industry. We planted two related populations across the four production regions of the United States. Statistical analysis of plant vigor at different sites suggest that the variation seen in growth of the population is not significantly influenced by location. However, the performance of specific plants is influenced by environment. These results suggest that much of the growth variation seen within each population is largely controlled by the genes expressed during growth with some influence from the environmental conditions underwhich the growth is taking place. These findings will assist breeders in determining the best plants for specific locations.

Technical Abstract: Over the last 75 years, the black raspberry industry in the United States has undergone a slow but steady contraction because of a lack of adapted, disease resistant cultivars. Recent research about the health benefits of a diet rich in polyphenolics, and black raspberries in particular, has led to a resurgence of interest in this fruit and a renewal of breeding efforts. This study seeks to advance and streamline identification of a variety of traits of interest to growers and consumers in black raspberry germplasm through phenotyping and socioeconomic analyses. The information will be integrated into breeding programs with the goal of developing disease resistant cultivars that satisfy the demands of the marketplace, adding to the sustainability and profitability of the industry. Two related full-sibling populations, designated ORUS 4304 (192 progenies) and ORUS 4305 (115 progenies), were planted across the production regions. Primocane (non-fruiting canes) vigor was rated from 1 (dead) to 9 (very vigorous) at each site. Initial analysis of genotype by environment (GxE) influences on primocane vigor indicated that overall the populations showed no significant difference in vigor in different environments; however, individual genotypes showed significant variation depending on site conditions. Vigor data will be compared with the genetic linkage map to determine which genomic regions contribute to the control of this complex trait. The genomic tools we are developing will be applied to the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and alleles important for breeding objectives regionally and nationally.