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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Animal Disease Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #306417

Research Project: Pharmacological and Immunologic Interventions Against Vector-Borne Bovine and Equine Babesiosis

Location: Animal Disease Research

Title: Proteomics informed by transcriptomics identifies novel secreted proteins in Dermacentor andersoni saliva

Author
item MUDENDA, LWIINDI - Washington State University
item AGUILAR PIERLÉ, SEBASTIÁN - Washington State University
item TURSE, JOSHUA - Washington State University
item NICORA, CARRIE - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
item Scoles, Glen
item PURVINE, SAMUEL - Batelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories
item CLAUSS, THERESE - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
item Ueti, Massaro
item BROWN, WENDY - Washington State University
item BRAYTON, KELLY - Washington State University

Submitted to: International Journal for Parasitology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 6/7/2014
Publication Date: 7/7/2014
Citation: Mudenda, L., Aguilar Pierlé, S., Turse, J.E., Nicora, C.D., Scoles, G.A., Purvine, S.O., Clauss, T.R., Ueti, M.W., Brown, W.C., Brayton, K.A. 2014. Proteomics informed by transcriptomics identifies novel secreted proteins in Dermacentor andersoni saliva . International Journal for Parasitology. 44(13):1029-1037.

Interpretive Summary: Dermacentor andersoni is a biological vector that transmits pathogens to animals and humans. Feeding success of the ticks is associated with secretion of proteins in the saliva that are essential to counteract pain, itch, and host immune responses. These proteins secreted into the tick saliva can destabilize host defenses such as hemostasis and inflammation, which would otherwise result in coagulation, wound repair and rejection of the ticks. Characterization of the proteins secreted in tick saliva offers an opportunity to develop anti-tick vaccines as an alternative to the use of chemical acaricides. D. andersoni saliva proteins were identified that are secreted during blood meal. We cross referenced data to identify 157 tick proteins of interest potentially involved in immunomodulation and blood feeding.

Technical Abstract: Dermacentor andersoni, known as the Rocky Mountain wood tick, is found in the western United States and transmits diseases of veterinary and public health importance including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Colarado tick fever and bovine anaplasmosis. Tick saliva is known to modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, enabling ticks to feed for several days without detection. During this time ticks subvert host defenses such as hemostasis and inflammation, which would otherwise result in coagulation, wound repair and rejection of the tick. Molecular characterization of the proteins and pharmacological molecules secreted in tick saliva offers an opportunity to develop anti-tick vaccines as an alternative to using acaricides, as well as new anti-inflammatory drugs. We performed proteomics informed by transcriptomics to identify D. andersoni saliva proteins that are secreted during feeding. The transcript data generated a database of 21,797 consensus sequences, which we used to identify 677 proteins secreted in the saliva of D. andersoni ticks fed for 2 and 5 days, following whole saliva mass spectrometry. Salivary gland transcript levels of unfed ticks were compared to two- and five-day fed ticks to identify genes upregulated early during tick feeding. We cross referenced the protein data with the transcriptome data to identify 157 proteins of interest for immunomodulation and blood feeding. Proteins of unknown function as well as known immunomodulators were identified.