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ARS Home » Plains Area » Brookings, South Dakota » Integrated Cropping Systems Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #303552

Title: Development and survivorship of a predatory lady beetle, Coccinella novemnotata, on various aphid diets

Author
item BRANDT, DANIELLE - South Dakota State University
item JOHNSON, PAUL - South Dakota State University
item LOSEY, JOHN - Cornell University - New York
item CATANGUI, MICHAEL - Non ARS Employee
item Hesler, Louis

Submitted to: Biocontrol
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: 11/11/2014
Publication Date: 11/27/2014
Citation: Brandt, D.M., Johnson, P.J., Losey, J.E., Catangui, M.A., Hesler, L.S. 2014. Development and survivorship of a predatory lady beetle, Coccinella novemnotata, on various aphid diets. Biocontrol. 60:221-229.

Interpretive Summary: Several studies have documented declines in native lady beetles species in North America, including the ninespotted lady beetle (C9), which was a common aphid predator distributed throughout much of America north of Mexico. Laboratory rearing may be important in C9 conservation and in supplying beetles for experiments to understand its decline and possible recovery. Rearing success may depend on optimizing a diet of aphid prey. This study’s objective was to compare development, survivorship and adult size of C9 reared on various aphid diets. Results showed that a diet with pea aphids, either alone or in combination with other aphid species, resulted in decreased development time, increased survival to adulthood, and larger females relative to solo diets of bird cherry-oat aphid, greenbug, yellow sugarcane aphid, soybean aphid, or cowpea aphid. Knowledge gained form this study about C9’s development and survival on various aphid species may not only aid successful laboratory rearing, but could also be used to identify likely habitats with suitable aphid prey where C9 may still exist or may be reestablished.

Technical Abstract: Several studies have documented declines in native lady beetles species in North America, including Coccinella novemnotata, the ninespotted lady beetle, which was a common aphid predator distributed throughout much of America north of Mexico. Ex situ rearing may be important in C. novemnotata conservation and to supply beetles for experiments to understand its decline and possible recovery. Rearing success may depend on optimizing a diet of aphid prey. This study’s objective was to compare development, survivorship and adult size of C. novemnotata reared on various aphid diets. Results showed that a diet with pea aphids (Acyrthosiphon pisum), either alone or in combination with other aphid species, resulted in decreased development time, increased survival to adulthood, and larger females relative to single-species diets of bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi), greenbug (Schizaphis graminum), yellow sugarcane aphid ( Sipha flava), soybean aphid (Aphis glycines) or cowpea aphid (Aphis craccivora). Knowledge of C. novemnotata development and survival on various aphid species may not only aid successful ex situ rearing, but could also be used to identify habitats where C. novemnotata may be extant or those with suitable prey for reestablishment or augmentation of C. novemnotata.