Skip to main content
ARS Home » Southeast Area » Mayaguez, Puerto Rico » Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #302932

Research Project: Genetic Enhancement of Common Bean Using Exotic Germplasm for Biotic and Abiotic Stress Tolerance

Location: Tropical Crops and Germplasm Research

Title: Evaluation of virulence of different isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) using two inoculation methods.

Author
item Estevez De Jensen, C. - University Of Puerto Rico
item Vargas, A. - University Of Puerto Rico
item Porch, Timothy - Tim
item Beaver, J. - University Of Puerto Rico

Submitted to: Bean Improvement Cooperative Proceedings
Publication Type: Research Notes
Publication Acceptance Date: 1/7/2014
Publication Date: 4/1/2014
Citation: Estevez De Jensen, C., Vargas, A., Porch Clay, T.G., Beaver, J.S. 2014. Evaluation of virulence of different isolates of Macrophomina phaseolina in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) using two inoculation methods. Bean Improvement Cooperative Proceedings. p. 215-216.

Interpretive Summary: Ashy stem blight is an endemic disease in Puerto Rico and in tropical and subtropical zones worldwide. Hot and dry conditions are ideal for disease development. Three common bean genotypes: BAT 477 (resistant), Verano (intermediate), and G122 (susceptible), and seven different isolates of Mph, were evaluated. Significant differences were detected in cultivars and isolates for lesion length and disease severity, while the “band-aid” method was more efficient in terms of disease development than the “toothpick” inoculation method. The band-aid method provides a simple and reliable virulence test for ashy stem blight to screen large numbers of genotypes under greenhouse conditions.

Technical Abstract: Ashy stem blight caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Mph) is an endemic disease in Puerto Rico and in tropical and subtropical zones worldwide. Hot and dry conditions are ideal for disease development. Three common bean genotypes: BAT 477 (resistant), Verano (intermediate), and G122 (susceptible), and seven different isolates of Mph, were evaluated. Significant differences were detected in cultivars and isolates for lesion length and disease severity, while the “band-aid” method was more efficient in terms of disease development than the “toothpick” inoculation method. The band-aid method provides a simple and reliable virulence test for Mph to screen large numbers of genotypes under greenhouse conditions.