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ARS Home » Pacific West Area » Pullman, Washington » Plant Germplasm Introduction and Testing Research » Research » Publications at this Location » Publication #302716

Research Project: Management of Plant Genetic Resources and Associated Information

Location: Plant Germplasm Introduction and Testing Research

Title: Furlough Mushrooms

Author
item Dugan, Frank

Submitted to: Fungi
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: 9/5/2014
Publication Date: 12/30/2014
Citation: Dugan, F.M. 2014. Furlough Mushrooms. Fungi 7(5):6-8.

Interpretive Summary: The manuscript provides a protocol for preserving two species of Agaricus mushroom (meadow mushroom and horse mushroom) in strong wine. Mushrooms are lightly boiled, placed in clean canning jars, and covered with wine (12% alcohol) or fortified wine such as port or sherry (17-18% alcohol). Successive decantations over several days replace wine to the equivalent of the volume of the jar to maximize concentration of alcohol in the mushrooms. The product is stored in the refrigerator for up to three months. Literature for identification of Agaricus to species is recommended. The history of preservation of foods in wine from classical antiquity to the present is concisely reviewed, and effects of alcohol on foodborne microbes are discussed.

Technical Abstract: The manuscript provides a protocol for preserving two species of mushroom (Agaricus campestris or meadow mushroom, and A. arvensis or horse mushroom) in strong wine. Mushrooms are kept at a low boil for 10 minutes, placed in clean canning jars, and covered with wine (12% ethanol) or fortified wine (17-18% ethanol). Successive decantations over several days replace wine to the equivalent of the volume of the jar to maximize concentration of alcohol in the mushrooms. The product is stored in the refrigerator for up to three months. Literature for identification of Agaricus to species is recommended. The history of preservation of foods in wine from classical antiquity to the present is concisely reviewed, as are effects of ethanol on various foodborne bacteria (including species of Listeria, Salmonella, Clostridium and others) and foodborne fungi (including Aspergillus, Penicillium, Mucor, Rhizopus and others).